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Test-driving Chrome for Ubuntu

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Software

With an alpha version of Google’s Chrome web browser recently released, I’ve been using it on Ubuntu for a few days. Below are some thoughts on the new browser and its ability to improve the Ubuntu experience.

The Good

1. speed - even in its alpha version, Chrome renders pages much faster than Firefox. This is especially true of sites that rely heavily on JavaScript, like the WordPress composer utility. No longer having to cringe every time I open a script-intensive web page is a definite plus.

2. simplified interface - Firefox’s interface is not bad, but Chrome raises the bar by removing extraneous menus by default in order to maximize the display area of web pages. I first found this frustrating, but quickly realized that I can get along very well without Firefox’s extensive menu. Chrome’s web-history and download-management interfaces, which are rendered as an ordinary web page in their own tabs, are also more convenient than the Firefox equivalents.

3. faster ‘awesome bar’ -

rest here




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