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A chat with Michael Evans of Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

A group of companies, including Google and Red Hat, the Raleigh software company, are working to create a $100 laptop that could be distributed to the impoverished around the globe. Powered by a hand crank, it would let them read digital textbooks, check e-mail and network with each other. The goal of the nonprofit group, called One Laptop Per Child, is to help children participate in the technology revolution. A working prototype of the computer has been built, and the goal is to begin shipping them next year.

Michael Evans, Red Hat's vice president for corporate development, is overseeing the involvement of the world's largest distributor of the Linux computer operating system. He spoke with staff writer Jonathan B. Cox. An edited transcript follows.

The machine looks childlike.

And it could change the lives of the world's children -- if it becomes reality.

Full Story.

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