Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Patent Claims Are a Red Herring, Microsoft Says

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

Legal organizations scrutinizing the legitimacy of Microsoft Corp.'s patent on automatic IP address generation have an "anti-patent" agenda, according to Microsoft.

"This isn't the first time we've seen these groups [the Public Patent Foundation and the Software Freedom Law Center] make accusations about Microsoft patents," said David Kaefer, Microsoft's director of intellectual property licensing, in an interview with eWEEK.com.

"It's been the case before that people have offered misleading claims, primarily because those people oppose software patents but use issues like this one to sow uncertainty about the patent process itself."

The brouhaha broke Tuesday, after a lawyer for Kenyon & Kenyon brought to eWEEK.com's attention patent USP 6,101,499, filed in 1998 and issued to Microsoft in 2000.

The patent covers technology that bears "more than a passing similarity" to IPv6, one of the backbones of the Internet, according to the lawyer, Frank Bernstein.

Bernstein represents a company-whose name he declined to disclose-that offers open-source products, he said. Bernstein said he also brought the patent to the attention of legal organizations before contacting eWEEK.com.

At the crux of the matter are allegations that Microsoft failed to disclose prior work done by the IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force) on the technology in question when it applied for the patent in April 1998.

PubPat's investigations have uncovered several references to the technology that count as prior art to the patent, Ravicher said, including several RFCs (requests for consensus) from the IETF's IPv6 working group.

Several Microsoft engineers who were involved in the IETF working group also show up as inventors listed on the patent, Ravicher said-a circumstance that may rule out the possibility that Microsoft's left hand didn't know what its right hand was doing.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

KDevelop 5.0.0 release

Almost two years after the release of KDevelop 4.7, we are happy to announce the immediate availability of KDevelop 5.0. KDevelop is an integrated development environment focusing on support of the C++, Python, PHP and JavaScript/QML programming languages. Many important changes and refactorings were done for version 5.0, ensuring that KDevelop remains maintainable and easy to extend and improve over the next years. Highlights include much improved new C/C++ language support, as well as polishing for Python, PHP and QML/JS. Read more

CoreOS 1068.10.0 Released with Many systemd Fixes, Still Using Linux Kernel 4.6

Today, August 23, 2016, the development team behind the CoreOS security-oriented GNU/Linux operating system have released the CoreOS 1068.10.0 stable update, along with new ISO images for all supported platforms. Read more

SUSE Linux and openSUSE Leap to Offer Better Support for ARM Systems Using EFI

The YaST development team at openSUSE and SUSE is reporting on the latest improvements that should be available in the upcoming openSUSE Leap 42.2 and SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2 operating systems. Read more

Create modular server-side Java apps direct from mvn modules with diet4j instead of an app server

In the latest release, the diet4j module framework for Java has learned to run modular Java apps using the Apache jsvc daemon (best known from running Tomcat on many Linux distros). If org.example.mydaemon is your top Maven project, all you do is specify it as the root module for your jsvc invocation, and diet4j figures out the dependencies when jsvc starts. An example systemd.service file is available.