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Seven Reasons Why Beef Is Not Ready For The Dinner Table

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Humor

Despite its many advocates, whenever I buy some beef and try it, I always end up going back to chicken. Chicken has what I want, and beef doesn't. The latest releases of beef got my hopes up, but I was again disappointed. Now, don't get me wrong. I like beef and I was one of the first people in my family to try some - I was even eating beef decades ago! And I have a tattoo of a cow on my back! But I think, for most diners, beef isn't ready for the dinner table, and here's why:

1) Too many cuts. Should I get loin, tenderloin, sirloin? Ribs, T-bones, tripe, tongue? Consumers are confused by all these choices; they want a wing, a drumstick, a breast, and a thigh in a bucket.

2) Lack of recipe support. Nobody knows how to cook it, except for those geeky elitist specialists who went to chef school.

3) Too complicated for Joe Sixpack.

rest here




Why the beef IS ready

I just came across this biased post and thought a reply was needed.

1) The beef is free as beer. You just have to get out of the door, find a beef, collect it and take it home. Then you can kill it and cook it with ultimate flexibility.

2) a properly conserved beef will last years. No need to buy a new chicken to upgrade your fridge every week.

rest here

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