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Mono in Linux

Yes
28% (168 votes)
No
72% (433 votes)
Total votes: 601

Linux is the KERNEL, you dummies!

...so Mono couldn't possibly get into it. ;p

This survey is useless. If you asked 'Gnome-Do in Linux', inaccurate as it still is, you would have gotten 90% yes because people love it and don't know/care it's written in Mono.

But about Mono they have heard rumours and evil-minded conspiracy theories by its haters...

So, this survey is absolutely useless.

re: Linux is the KERNEL

eet wrote:

...so Mono couldn't possibly get into it. ;p

This survey is useless. If you asked 'Gnome-Do in Linux', inaccurate as it still is, you would have gotten 90% yes because people love it and don't know/care it's written in Mono.

At least on this site, Linux refers to Kernel OR distributions.

' made up linux fanboy crap '

I dont think such words are to be considered thoughtful when addressing people whom you call childish.

Both sides are rather emotional atm for various reasons and admittedly its a shame things can't be resolved or discussed without resorting to such things.

Two wrongs dont really make a right, at least Ive heard that said, YMMV.

Feel free to offer your side where you think reason has been left for just emotion, and others can do the same.

This is linux where choice matters and where we're supposed to unite for FOSS.

I dont see how mono does that personally, and that is my own individual, right to hold opinion, and the reasons I believe as such are:

http://www.itwire.com/content/view/25215/1090/1/0/
http://www.groklaw.net/articlebasic.php?story=20080528133529454
http://talkback.zdnet.com/5208-10535-0.html?forumID=1&threadID=47762&messageID=890012

You're free to offer a response, non attacking debate preferrably, as anything else should be seen in the light in which its presented.

It would seem- fedora for '12' has already made up its mind, I hear opensuse is considering things, given they are rewriting Easy-LTSP-NG (read: in python), and debian tomboy controversy is going on it would seem:

http://boycottnovell.com/2009/06/16/debian-not-including-mono/

' Steve McIntyre telling iTWire today that "there's a chance that it might do, but it's under discussion at the moment." '

But anyway, I report you decide...its foss afterall , where choice should be relevant, not forced.

cheers
nl

re: I hate Mono

People, Mono is just a piece of software. How childish are you to "hate" something so mundane and inanimate? You remind me of the knuckle draggers wasting complete school years arguing about which is better, Audi or BMW. Grow up, take a night class on Business 101, and maybe read a newspaper - there's plenty of real stuff to worry about instead of this made up linux fanboy crap.

You never had to package

You never had to package that crap up either. It sucks so why don't you keep talking out your ass like you actually know something.

let me explain again

Your browser erased your boot sector.......at this moment you start feeling full of love vonskippy?....upssss wait your office application erases a 100 pages because it tried to secondguess intention, what do you do? just restart writing again, no emotion right?

And just a minute what is this?:
"- there's plenty of real stuff to worry about instead of this made up linux fanboy crap."

yeahhh that is real grown up and mature lol.

Please understand that because you do not understand linux does not mean you are dumb like you imply by your comments, just accept that you are good at something...just not linux who cares?

Every desktop has it advantages and disadvantages, linux, mac or windows.
And everybody has a reason to use what they use, even if it is I don't really care.

Plus fair competition generates excellence, hence the dualboot comment, the best of both worlds, anything wrong there????

How good or inexpensive would windows be if they had no linux or mac to compete against? vista before patches for example, but even after patches I am not exactly impressed by vista, I use and curse at it, same linux ,and give me a mac and the same would happen, even if it is at the prices.

If windows 7 turns out decent, I would thank linux and mac and last of all and certainly least windows lol.

lol, cool off windows fanboy, live a life and by that I mean a decent life.

I hate mono.

I hate mono.

Re: I hate mono

poodles wrote:
I hate mono.

Same here. People who develop using mono are lazy developers.

Mono

Technically: mono is ok or good, a working infrastructure. And you could love it because you already know how to handle the product.
Emotionally: no after so many days lost trying to fix either windows problems, or decisions made on your computer by windows. Yes a blue screen at midnight with no easy fix, or a slow virus laden computer with no easy fix...yup you could hate it.
Common sense: So you would trust windows, on a clear product with a unclear legal standing......You do not need technical knowledge, to know this is not a very good proposition. How can you trust a product from a company known not to be transparent?

So depending on the stand you take you either love it, hate it or distrust it.
But if you take them all into account it is not a product you can embrace, it would be like marrying the person who you love but always made your life miserable hahahah

For me a reason to use linux is it keeps windows and mac competitive lol. And pushes them to offer a better product at a better price. One reason to always double boot and support linux.

The grape Kool-Aid

While, for those who have already drunk of the .NET Kool-Aid, Mono offers an avenue of utility, to incorporate it into Linux or the Linux desktop is to create a dependency, at once both superfluous and encumbering.

It is ironic that Gnome was formed in response to the proprietary nature of Qt, the basis of KDE. Qt has become GPL while Gnome has contorted itself into embracing an encumbrance with far more menacing portents than Trolltech ever posed.

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