Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Can new executives deliver on Novell's open source vision?

Filed under
Linux

In Part 1 of my look at Novell last week, my topic was empty chairs. This week I'll look at the other side of the story. There are new bodies occupying key seats at Novell these days, a sure sign that the company's bid to regain its prominence in the server software market isn't over yet.

Trying out the chair in his office at Novell headquarters for the first time this very morning is Jeffrey Jaffe. Previously, Jaffe had been president of Lucent Technologies' storied Bell Labs. Today he begins his tenure as Novell's executive vice president and CTO, the company's first technology officer since Alan Nugent left the position in March.

Although Jaffe brings considerable technical acumen to the table, the job he's taking on won't be easy. As I mentioned last week, financial analysts and key Novell shareholders have been clamoring for change, both in the company's direction and to its product line. In particular, they want to see Novell increase its emphasis on open source. When I spoke to Jaffe last week, he made it clear that he fully intends to meet that demand.

"I've believed for a long time, actually starting from when I was at IBM, that open source and open standards are what customers want," Jaffe said. "They want it because it gives them choice, and they want it because it gives them low-cost computing, ultimately."

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Will Microsoft’s Embrace Smother GitHub?

Microsoft has had an adversarial relationship with the open-source community. The company viewed the free Open Office software and the Linux operating system—which compete with Microsoft Office and Windows, respectively—as grave threats. In 2001 Windows chief Jim Allchin said: “Open source is an intellectual-property destroyer.” That same year CEO Steve Ballmer said “Linux is a cancer.” Microsoft attempted to use copyright law to crush open source in the courts. When these tactics failed, Microsoft decided if you can’t beat them, join them. It incorporated Linux and other open-source code into its servers in 2014. By 2016 Microsoft had more programmers contributing code to GitHub than any other company. The GitHub merger might reflect Microsoft’s “embrace, extend and extinguish” strategy for dominating its competitors. After all, GitHub hosts not only open-source software and Microsoft software but also the open-source projects of other companies, including Oracle, IBM, and Amazon Web Services. With GitHub, Microsoft could restrict a crucial platform for its rivals, mine data about competitors’ activities, target ads toward users, or restrict free services. Its control could lead to a sort of surveillance of innovative activity, giving it a unique, macro-scaled insight into software development. Read more

Android Leftovers

Why Open Source Matters to Alibaba

At present, Alibaba has more than 150 open source projects. We work on the open source projects with the aim to contribute to the industry and solve real-life problems. We share our experiences with the rest of the open source enthusiasts. As a long-time contributor to various other open source projects, Alibaba and Alibaba Cloud have fostered a culture that encourages our teams to voluntarily contribute to various open source projects, either by sharing experiences or helping others to solve problems. Sharing and contributing to the community altogether is in the DNA of Alibaba’s culture. Read more

today's howtos