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Hands off the Gimp

Filed under
GIMP
Ubuntu

Really, you wouldn’t dare..

  • rickspencer3 proposes pulling the gimp from the CD:
    • It takes up a lot of space that we need for couchdb, etc…
    • F-Spot has key features, like crop and red-eye removal
    • It’s a power user tool, users shouldn’t stumble into it
  • Discussion points brought up that
    • The gimp currently uses 26 megs of space, 20 of which are documentation, which could be moved online
    • The gimp, though not totally user friendly, is very useful, and does not require “importing” to edit

ZOMG !

No offense to Rick Spencer but.. How reasonable is the rationale behind this ? That f-spot is enough ? Enough for what ? For laughing ?

How do I scale an image in f-spot ? If there’s a way, I have not been able to find it (same for red eyes). How do I annotate an image (putting text somewhere) ?

Yet people ask “Gimp is cool but.. should it belong to LiveCD?” I’ll give you a better question: what should belong to the LiveCD ?

rest here




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