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Get to know Linux: man pages

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Linux

Have you ever had someone tell you to “RTFM” (aka: “Read The Flippin’ Man page”) only to realize you have no idea what man pages were? “Man pages” is short for “Manual Pages” and exist for both UNIX and Linux operating systems. Each man page is a self-contained document that holds all of the key bits of information you need to learn the basics of installed Linux commands and applications.

Of course the usefulness of a man page is dictated by the create of said page. Some man pages are an outstanding resource for learning about that particular application. Conversely, some man pages are fairly worthless. This article is not about discerning which man pages are worthwhile and which are not. This article will help you understand how best use the man command so you can make the most of this reference system.

Basic usage




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