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Fight Club: Windows 7 vs Mandriva 2009.1

Filed under
Microsoft
MDV

The war has begun. Quite literally. The final release of Windows 7, the latest (and greatest?) version of Windows is just months away. We laid our hands on the RC (release candidate) available for free on Microsoft’s website, and took it for a spin against Mandriva 2009.1 Spring. Who won? The results are most surprising!

The packages compared

Both Windows 7 RC and Mandriva 2009.1 Spring (Free) come on single-layer DVDs. Windows 7 is a smaller download at 2.35 GB, whereas Mandriva weighs in at 4.34 GB, or 1.99 GB more. Both are ISO images, and have to be burned onto a disk.

Installation: Head-on

We started out by creating two empty unformatted partitions of 25 GB each on the shiny new caviare. Then, after starting the countdown timer, we started the computer with the Windows 7 RC DVD in the drive. A little while later, a plain text message greeted us: “Press any key to boot from CD or DVD” with a growing number of dots after it (it’s supposed to stay five seconds, after which it automatically boots from the hard disk). After a jab at the Enter key, the screen went blank.

Not for long. Just a split second later, a screen with the message “Windows Is Loading Files” along with a progress bar appeared.

rest here




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