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Tango project aims to clean up the desktop

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Software

One obstacle for Linux to overcome on the desktop is the lack of a consistent visual interface. While Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X offer users and developers consistent themes, Linux supports a plethora of dissimilar desktop environments and window managers. The Tango Desktop Project is working to change that.

The Tango project is an effort to establish high-usability visual themes for Linux desktops that function consistently across multiple desktop environments. Tango evolved from private discussions between Novell's Jakub Steiner and Mozilla Visual Identity Team lead Steven Garrity. The project went public at the Boston GNOME Summit in October. Project participants are working on specifications for cross-environment themes and a fully compatible theme they hope will be adopted by vendors.

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Linux better than Windows, Gnome/KDE learn from each other

I think Linux is much more consistent than Windows applications which each have their own totally different very ugly and confusing interfaces. Linux interfaces will likely need some getting used to, but at least they make sense once you work with them for a while. And they are attractive to look at to. This is a hard issue to deal with, but I like the KDE icons better especially the Oxygen icons for KDE 4. Unless Tango can design them better than Oxygen, then Gnome should just use the KDE style. KDE can take some hints from Gnome in hiding some of the complexity of the underlying sytem, though too.

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