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Google's Chrome OS Threatens Linux, Is Good For Microsoft

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Google




re: Google OS

Meh, who cares, as they state the WHOLE purpose of their OS is to get users to the web their advertisements faster.

Not everyone is enamored with the whole "cloud" thang as google is. I like a computer that can be used anywhere - regardless of it's internet access, and secured by me, not a corporate stranger who will sell me out at the first whiff of federal unease.

Besides, could they announce it any earlier? It's months (and months and months and months and months) away from even alpha. I wonder what their REAL motive is for announcing so early.

re: Google OS

vonskippy wrote:

Not everyone is enamored with the whole "cloud" thang as google is. I like a computer that can be used anywhere - regardless of it's internet access, and secured by me, not a corporate stranger who will sell me out at the first whiff of federal unease.

I feel the same way, but probably a bit more paranoid. I hate the whole idea of "the cloud." Why would anyone want to trust their data to a bunch of profit-hungry strangers? And with today's shrinking privacy and personal rights, this is just another way to "kept an eye on." I just don't understand why some folks are so gung-ho about it.

And like broadband in the US is anywhere near reliable...

I curse the day I began using gmail!

Google ChromeOS: Have people taken leave of their senses?

Reading the commentary from the likes of TechCrunch, Mashable, The Guardian and even our own esteemed Sam Diaz on the pre-launch (you’ve got another YEAR to wait) you’d think the Google ChromeOS was the closest thing to the second coming of Jesus Christ. Get a grip people.

The initial target seems to be the Netbook but I don’t see how anyone can realistically extrapolate that to world dominance of the entire PC market, let alone the crucially important server market.

Google has said it wants to get help from the open source community. I’ll bet they do. In offering ChromeOS as open source, Google has effectively washed its hands of responsibility to maintain.

Even then and despite the proclivity among geeks for all things OS, when ChromeOS does emerge it will be a v1.0. No enterprise buyer I know will go within a country mile of committing its users’ kit to something at that level of maturity.

rest here

Chrome OS – What Happens Next?

mobilitysite.com: Oh BOY Microsoft are you gonna get it NOW!”. Many have Redmond dead, buried and paved over by just the announcement of Google’s upcoming cloud-based operating system.

The End of Linux As We Know It: Red Hat and suse and Ubuntu and Fedora and Eudora and Debian…what do they mean to the average consumer? About as much as Messi and Kaka and Ronaldo and Ronaldinho and Totti and Buffon mean to American sports fans…nothing. Now, they won’t have to try since Chrome OS will be based on one of those lucky Linux kernels, completely hiding it from view, and leave the IT lab far behind.

Apple Makes Phones…JUST Phones: I have had the nagging suspicion for ages now that Steve Jobs would be happiest selling off the MacBook line and focusing totally on iPhones, iPods and other consumer products. Lately people have seemed less comfortable with The Turtlenecked One…

The Death of Firefox:
Evil Empire II:

rest here


Also: Linux Distros Upbeat, Wary of Google's New Chrome OS

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