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PCLinuxOS Minime 09.1 on my Thinkpad T61

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PCLOS

For the last few months my Thinkpad has been, and still is, the host of several wonderful Linux distributions, all of them based on the new KDE 4 desktop environment. So, today, in mid summer 2009, is there still a reason to run a KDE 3 desktop? Well, if it wasn’t for PCLinuxOS I would have to say no. But this little distro can really hold its own against any of the large commercially supported distributions around. I am going to divide this review in three parts, “The Good”, “The Bad”, and “The Ugly”. Wink

The Good

PCLinuxOS has some very unique features that make it a standout among Linux distributions. Perhaps the most important reason that keeps me coming back to PCLinuxOS is the fact that, once installed, you just have to keep applying updates and it stays current for years. For example, I installed PCLinuxOS on my home machine in early 2007 and down to today I have not had to reinstall it again. Today it has the latest and greatest software that is available on the recently released 2009 batch.
While we are on the subject of updates, I think it is important to mention that PClinuxOS now has a new “Update Notifier” that helps for remembering to stay up to date.

rest here




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