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GNOME-Colors: Consistence and Elegance For GNOME Desktops

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Software

Lets face it, the default GNOME desktop isn’t the easiest desktop on the eye. While Ubuntu’s desert brown is actually an eye sore, other distros like Mint and Fedora have done better jobs in theming their desktops. But still most users aren’t content with default desktops and usually tweak around their themes via gnome-look.org among others.

Most Linux beginners have a hard time getting everything on gnome-look.org to work, while veterans might not have the time to scour the web and build every bit of their desktops to their taste. Luckily, there are many automated options for system-wide theming out there. One of these options is GNOME-Colors.

Enter GNOME-Colors

The GNOME-Colors is a project that aims to make the GNOME desktop as elegant, consistent and colorful as possible.

The current goal is to allow full color customization of themes, icons, GDM logins and splash screens. There are already six full color-schemes available; Brave (Blue), Human (Orange), Wine (Red), Noble (Purple), Wise (Green) and Dust (Chocolate).

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