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What I Like About Firefox

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Moz/FF

There are camps of people who use different browsers and have long-winded, heated arguments over which one is best. I have no strong feelings about browsers. They’re tools that help get the job done. That being said, if a tool can make my life simpler, more efficient, and fun, I’m more likely to use it. Firefox 3 fits the bill and gives me a lot of gadgets and options that make me smile. Here are a few reasons why I like it.

Password Management

My list of passwords is longer than I care to admit. Sometimes, I forget them. In the Security Options on Firefox 3, I can manage my passwords easily. Firefox asks me every time I enter a password if I want it to remember it for me. If I ask Firefox to remember it, I can view it later, search for it, or remove it. I can also remove individual passwords without losing my entire list. If I’m curious, I can even re-sort the list to see how many times I’ve used the same password for different sites. Um... yeah… it’s not a good idea to do that….

Themes

Themes allow you to play dress up with your browser.

rest here




Firefox3.5

I just upgraded to Firefox 3.5 and I have to admit the Mozilla guys have really stepped up their game.

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