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Linux Vendor Settles With Microsoft

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Legal

A manufacturer of Linux-based networking devices has agreed to pay an undisclosed sum to Microsoft in order to settle a patent claim, Microsoft disclosed Wednesday.

Under the agreement, Melco Group will pay the sum to Microsoft in exchange for indemnity coverage for its Buffalo brand Network Attached Storage devices and routers. The patent indemnification covers Melco and its customers.

"We are pleased to reach this agreement with Melco Group," said David Kaefer, Microsoft's general manager for intellectual property, in a statement.
Microsoft did not state which patents were at issue, but the company in recent months has said that it believes certain parts of the open source Linux operating system, including versions distributed by commercial vendors like Red Hat (NYSE: RHT), violate its Windows patents. "Many companies have entered into similar agreements with Microsoft covering their Linux-based offerings, something that is a reflection of both Microsoft's decades-long commitment to R&D in the operating system space and the high-quality patent portfolio we've developed through our R&D efforts," said Kaefer.

Melco officials said the company plans to increase its use of Windows in its products while continuing to maintain open source components.

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Also: Another company signs Linux patent-protection deal with Microsoft

As usual...

"Microsoft did not state which patents were at issue..."

Who knows, maybe the claim is valid, but why can't they be open enough to explain what patent we're talking about? At the moment it looks more like MS is trying to collect from the most vulnerable while...

"... but the company in recent months has said that it believes certain parts of the open source Linux operating system, including versions distributed by commercial vendors like Red Hat, violate its Windows patents."

... keeping their FUD in full spin. Like we haven't heard that for several years.

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