Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Wolvix 1.0.4, the adventure continues

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Another one of my favorite Linux distributions released an updated version a coupla days ago and I've been anxious to test it out. Wolvix 1.0.4 was released on December 1 and it includes lots of updates and enhancments. Tuxmachines even tried the manual hard drive install today and spent most of the day playing around in it.

As you might know from a previous review that I have been quite taken with Wolvix Linux. Whether it was the wonderfully polished and professional appearance or exceptional performance, there are plenty of reasons to become enamored with Wolvix. From a wide range of applications, many useful tools and utilities, to a great looking desktop, Wolvix can meet most of your everyday computing needs.

        

This release brings:

  • Xfce4 4.2.3.2 | OpenOffice 2 | Evolution Groupware Suite 2.4 | Mozilla Firefox 1.5 | Azureus 2.3.0.6 | GnomeBaker 0.5.0 | GnomeMeeting 1.2.2

  • Lots of packages has been added from the Freerock GNOME project giving the release a more unified GTK look.
  • Better mime handling in Firefox and Xfe.
  • Many upgraded applications and libraries.

        

The appearance seems revamped as well. The default desktop background color appears to be a lighter more neutral and subtle shade of gray and a lovely matching gray-tone window decoration was chosen for the xfce4 enironment. One can choose from a the default gray pawprint or one of the two others coming in black or white. The fonts render beautifully in either vesa graphic mode or perhaps even a bit better when utilizing the included NVIDIA drivers. Including those drivers is a nice touch especially since no kernel source or compiler are included.

Using the slapt-get/gslapt package management setup, one can install many developer tools/libraries such as gcc, autoconf, and make.

        

Of particular interest to me was the newly posted HOWTO install Wolvix to a hard drive. The instructions lay out the task step by step, but as usual comes with no warranty and very stern warnings. I followed it for the most part and ended with a real nice ...fun system. It was quite easy to accomplish as Wolven's howto was clearly and concisely written.

        

        

I've spent most of the day setting up my new wolvix install and am looking forward to many enjoyable and productive hours using my wonderful wolvix system. Wolvix still retains it's stability while continuing to offer some of the newest application versions available. This distro just gets better each release.


In addition to his updated distro, wolven has also revamped his site. While retaining the same color scheme and overall feel of the first site, Wolven's new drupal site sure looks great. Despite the customizations, I reckonized it as possibly drupal at first site, yet was glad to find it posted to confirm. It is another testament to the flexability of drupal and the creativity of our hero. I encourage you to visit this cool looking site and perhaps download Wolvix 1.0.4 while you are there.


What else can I say? It was a great os when I tried it the first time and it's even better now. More diverse applications and many others updated, a great look and feel with wonderful performance, and now a hard drive install are just some of the reasons to test drive Wolvix 1.0.4. Once again tuxmachines found little if anything to complain about concerning Wolvix Linux. I plan to keep an eye on continued development and will keep you posted.

More screenshots in the gallery.


re: Wolvix

It looks really nice, but the installation seems like more effort than I am prepared to invest at the moment... I think I'll wait until their installer is finished Smile

In the meantime, if I want a system based on XFce with GTK apps thrown in, I think I will be able to get pretty much the same result with KateOS, which is also a very fast, stable and nice distro, but is more geared towards HD install, and is going to release a new version very soon, I believe.

BTW, do you know if is it possible to install Wolvix on reiserfs? (ext3 is the only one mentioned in their howto)

re: Wolvix

Yeah, KateOS is a really nice one too. You couldn't go wrong with either. Both developers are really nice and accessible too.

Actually, the install of Wolvix was quicker and more painless than a lot of them to me. A quick copy... It takes about 5 minutes at most.

Um, no I bet it won't work with reiserfs. I didn't try it this time, but back in September I tried to figure out how to do it myself and my steps were eerily similar - almost identical. ...But it wouldn't boot and I even tried to make an initrd for it. Turns out the reason was using reiser I'm just almost sure now. I don't know why I didn't think to try ext3... sometimes I can't see the forest for the trees!

I mean you could probably make reiserfs work if you wanted to rebuild the kernel while you were still chroot'd in... I'd almost bet it uses a vanilla kernel.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Code of Conduct, Kelly Davis, Celebrate Firefox Internet Champions

  • ow We’re Making Code of Conduct Enforcement Real — and Scaling it
    This is the first line of our Community Participation Guidelines — and an nudge to keep empathy at center when designing response processes. Who are you designing for? Who is impacted? What are their needs, expectations, dependencies, potential bias and limitations?
  • Role Models in AI: Kelly Davis
    Meet Kelly Davis, the Manager/Technical Lead of the machine learning group at Mozilla. His work at Mozilla includes developing an open speech recognition system with projects like Common Voice and Deep Speech (which you can help contribute to). Beyond his passion for physics and machine learning, read on to learn about how he envisions the future of AI, and advice he offers to young people looking to enter the field.
  • Celebrate Firefox Internet Champions
    While the world celebrates athletic excellence, we’re taking a moment to share some of the amazing Internet champions that help build, support and share Firefox.

Canonical Ubuntu 2017 milestones, a year in the rulebook

So has Canonical been breaking rules with Ubuntu is 2017, or has it in been writing its own rulebook? Back in April we saw an AWS-tuned kernel of Ubuntu launched, the move to cloud is unstoppable, clearly. We also saw Ubuntu version 17.04 released, with Unity 7 as the default desktop environment. This release included optimisations for environments with low powered graphics hardware. Read more Also: Ubuntu will let upgraders ‘opt-in’ to data collection in 18.04

The npm Bug

  • ​Show-stopping bug appears in npm Node.js package manager
    Are you a developer who uses npm as the package manager for your JavaScript or Node.js code? If so, do not -- I repeat do not -- upgrade to npm 5.7.0. Nothing good can come of it. As one user reported, "This destroyed 3 production servers after a single deploy!" So, what happened here? According to the npm GitHub bug report, "By running sudo npm under a non-root user (root users do not have the same effect), filesystem permissions are being heavily modified. For example, if I run sudo npm --help or sudo npm update -g, both commands cause my filesystem to change ownership of directories such as /etc, /usr, /boot, and other directories needed for running the system. It appears that the ownership is recursively changed to the user currently running npm."
  • Botched npm Update Crashes Linux Systems, Forces Users to Reinstall
    A bug in npm (Node Package Manager), the most widely used JavaScript package manager, will change ownership of crucial Linux system folders, such as /etc, /usr, /boot. Changing ownership of these files either crashes the system, various local apps, or prevents the system from booting, according to reports from users who installed npm v5.7.0. —the buggy npm update.

Windows 10 WSL vs. Linux Performance For Early 2018

Back in December was our most recent round of Windows Subsystem for Linux benchmarking with Windows 10 while since then both Linux and Windows have received new stable updates, most notably for mitigating the Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities. For your viewing pleasure today are some fresh benchmarks looking at the Windows 10 WSL performance against Linux using the latest updates as of this week while also running some comparison tests too against Docker on Windows and Oracle VM VirtualBox. Read more