Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Articles from 2008

This began as a list of original articles found on tuxmachines.org, either by me or someone else, but it has since morphed into a list of original articles found on tuxmachines.org and the articles I've had published elsewhere.

  1. Why the world isn't ready for Linux* - Dec 30, 2008
  2. My New Laptop and Linux* - Dec 25, 2008
  3. Revised Slackware keeps it simple - Dec 23, 2008
  4. openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early - Dec 18, 2008
  5. The State of UK Terrestrial Web TV* - Dec 15, 2008
  6. How about "just using" instead of "migrating"?* - Dec 12, 2008
  7. Meet PCLinuxOS 2009 (Beta 1) - Oct 18, 2008
  8. Foresight Kid's can inspire young minds - Oct 09, 2008
  9. Sidux grows on you - Oct 08, 2008
  10. What Using Linux Means to Me* - Oct 06, 2008
  11. Why I Choose Linux* - Oct 06, 2008
  12. What I wish I'd read months ago about KDE3 vs. KDE4* - Oct 02, 2008
  13. Mandriva 2009/KDE 4.1 Revisited* - Sep 27, 2008
  14. The worlds best Linux Distro is now available* - Sep 26, 2008
  15. Michael Larabel talks about Phoronix - Sep 15, 2008
  16. Some Reasons NOT to use Linux. Ever. At all.* - Sep 11, 2008
  17. Dell Mini 9....* - Sep 09, 2008
  18. Linux-powered LinPC desktop is a bargain - Sep 08, 2008
  19. Mandriva 2009 Beta 1 & KDE 4.1 - A Brief Report* - Aug 15, 2008
  20. Gentoo 2008.0: Return to greatness? - Aug 7, 2008
  21. Parsix GNU/Linux 1.5r1 - Aug 04, 2008
  22. Tux's Dream* - July 25, 2008
  23. Welcome to my Nightmare - July 21, 2008
  24. Proprietary software? Counsel objects - July 17, 2008
  25. Desktop Distros* - July 14, 2008
  26. Linux is a tool* - July 8, 2008
  27. Penumbra Overture - If You Dare - July 5, 2008
  28. On OpenSuse 11* - July 1, 2008
  29. Battle of the Titans - Mandriva vs openSUSE: The Rematch - June 25, 2008
  30. New media center OS is pleasing to the eye and ear - June 23, 2008
  31. Kudos to openSUSE 11.0 - June 20, 2008
  32. Tuxpaint is fun for kids and adults - June 9, 2008
  33. Openoffice.org mailing labels solution* - June 8, 2008
  34. A Tiny Look at TinyMe 2008.0 - May 25, 2008
  35. No is Ark verdict - May 21, 2008
  36. New group advocates for FOSS in libraries - May 19, 2008
  37. Hardy Heron converts an Ubuntu skeptic - May 9, 2008
  38. Top 5 Tiny Distros - May 3, 2008
  39. New SymphonyOne distro plays a different tune - Apr 30, 2008
  40. First look at Draco GNU/Linux 0.3 - Apr 21, 2008
  41. PCLinuxOS Gnome links two worlds - Apr 10, 2008
  42. First look at Dreamlinux 3.0 - Apr 07, 2008
  43. GoblinX packs a lot into compact Slackware-based distro - Mar 21, 2008
  44. Drupal keeps getting better - Mar 20, 2008
  45. First look at PC-BSD 1.5 - Mar 17, 2008
  46. Latest Slax release needs more time in the oven - Mar 04, 2008
  47. Parsix: Persian distro makes GNOME look good - Feb 25, 2008
  48. Create a backup server with Restore - Feb 19, 2008
  49. Vector Linux 5.9: Light, fast Slackware-based distro* - Feb 13, 2008
  50. First look at Zenwalk Linux 5.0 - Feb 11, 2008
  51. Litrix: Linux from Brazil to your desktop - Jan 24, 2008
  52. SimplyMEPIS 7.0 is a keeper - Jan 18, 2008
  53. KDE 4.0: Everything that has an end, has a beginning* - Jan 18, 2008
  54. Osmo: A daily organizer - Jan 09, 2008

* - Posts by other contributers.





More in Tux Machines

Schools that #GoOpen should #GoOpenSource

School administrators know that traditional proprietary textbooks are expensive. Teachers in budget-strapped schools often face shortages of textbooks. Worse, print content is usually out-of-date as soon as the ink dries on the page. There has to be something better than students hauling bulbous backpacks loaded with dead knowledge stamped on dead trees. In the fall of 2015, the U.S. Department of Education launched the #GoOpen campaign, an initiative encouraging public schools to adopt openly-licensed digital educational materials to transform teaching and learning, and perhaps lighten both backpacks and textbook bills. The Department recently published the #GoOpen District Launch Packet, a useful step-by-step implementation guide for schools planning a transition from traditional textbooks to Open Educational Resources (OER). We should applaud the Department of Education's efforts to promote affordable, equitable, and quality educational materials for all schools. Their initiative empowers educators to curate, shape, and share educational content at a local level. No longer is the written word of proprietary publishers like Pearson the fountain of all classroom knowledge. Districts that choose to #GoOpen opt to honor teacher expertise, empower them to build communities of shared practice, and encourage collaboration with colleagues across counties and states. Given unfettered permission to revise, remix, and redistribute curriculum material, teachers are trusted to become active agents in the creation of high-quality learning materials. Read more

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat CEO Tells LinuxCon Crowd What Makes Linux Stand Out
    Five years ago, on the 20th anniversary of Linux, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst delivered a keynote address at LinuxCon. Today, he returned to the LinuxCon stage here to help celebrate the 25th anniversary of Linux, bringing a message not all that different from the one he shared in 2011. The Linux world, however, is a different place in 2016, with one-time mortal foe Microsoft now embracing the open-source model. Whitehurst briefly shared the keynote stage with Wim Coekaerts, corporate vice president of enterprise open source at Microsoft, which is something that wouldn't have happened five years ago. Red Hat and Microsoft today partner at multiple levels, as the message and value of open source has continued to expand. During his keynote, Whitehurst said that it's hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about the history of Linux and vice versa, as the two are very much intertwined. Back in the 1990s when Red Hat got started a few years after Linux's birth, Whitehurst said his company didn't have a great business model. At one point, Red Hat actually tried to sell shrink-wrapped boxed software at big box retailers. Around 2001, Red Hat first introduced the enterprise open-source software model that is the core of the company's business today. The basic idea is to bundle open-source software together, test and certify the software, and then provide multiple years of enterprise-grade support.
  • Option Market: Red Hat Inc Risk Hits A Deteriorated Level
  • Building Fedora Rawhide Images with Imagefactory
  • Fedora 24 Release Party in Singapore
    As you might know, Fedora released its 24th version at the end of June! Recently, the Fedorans in Singapore had a party to celebrate the release. The release party was not only to celebrate its release, but also to commemorate Fedora’s open source journey so far. We invited people from different diverse background to join us for a night of fun and open conversations (Singapore is a cosmopolitan country!)

GNOME News

  • Sysprof + Builder
    After the GNOME 3.20 cycle completed I started revamping Sysprof. More here, here, and here. The development went so smoothly that I did a 3.20 release a couple of weeks later. A primary motivation of that work was rebuilding Sysprof into a set of libraries for building new tools. In particular, I wanted to integrate Sysprof with Builder as our profiler of choice. On my flight back from GUADEC I laid the groundwork to integrate these two projects. As of Builder 3.21.90 (released yesterday) you can now profile your project quite easily. There are more corner cases we need to handle but I consider those incremental bugs now.
  • GUADEC… Its been fun.
    I’m not really much of a traveler or outgoing in any way. So when I was invited to GUADEC, I wasn’t very sure about it. It took some encouragement from my mentor and a fellow GSoC mate to convince me. And… I’m glad I went! It was one of those things that I could not have experienced from my comfy chair to which I reserve myself for the greater part of my day. In fact this trip makes me feel I might be wrong about social interactions not being time well spent for me (but then again I don’t exactly buckle down into ambitious projects, so you’re free to call me ignorant).
  • gnome-boxes: GSoC Evaluation
    This post is meant to be a final self-evaluation and self-analysis of my work for gnome-boxes during the summer. The initial project idea was about implementing/fixing a bunch of SPICE-based features/bugs to/in Boxes. The list of bugs of the SPICE component has since changed, as some new bugs have been discovered and some old ones have been closed, so I made a summary of my involvement...

Paid-for Microsoft Openwashing at LinuxCon