Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Articles from 2008

This began as a list of original articles found on tuxmachines.org, either by me or someone else, but it has since morphed into a list of original articles found on tuxmachines.org and the articles I've had published elsewhere.

  1. Why the world isn't ready for Linux* - Dec 30, 2008
  2. My New Laptop and Linux* - Dec 25, 2008
  3. Revised Slackware keeps it simple - Dec 23, 2008
  4. openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early - Dec 18, 2008
  5. The State of UK Terrestrial Web TV* - Dec 15, 2008
  6. How about "just using" instead of "migrating"?* - Dec 12, 2008
  7. Meet PCLinuxOS 2009 (Beta 1) - Oct 18, 2008
  8. Foresight Kid's can inspire young minds - Oct 09, 2008
  9. Sidux grows on you - Oct 08, 2008
  10. What Using Linux Means to Me* - Oct 06, 2008
  11. Why I Choose Linux* - Oct 06, 2008
  12. What I wish I'd read months ago about KDE3 vs. KDE4* - Oct 02, 2008
  13. Mandriva 2009/KDE 4.1 Revisited* - Sep 27, 2008
  14. The worlds best Linux Distro is now available* - Sep 26, 2008
  15. Michael Larabel talks about Phoronix - Sep 15, 2008
  16. Some Reasons NOT to use Linux. Ever. At all.* - Sep 11, 2008
  17. Dell Mini 9....* - Sep 09, 2008
  18. Linux-powered LinPC desktop is a bargain - Sep 08, 2008
  19. Mandriva 2009 Beta 1 & KDE 4.1 - A Brief Report* - Aug 15, 2008
  20. Gentoo 2008.0: Return to greatness? - Aug 7, 2008
  21. Parsix GNU/Linux 1.5r1 - Aug 04, 2008
  22. Tux's Dream* - July 25, 2008
  23. Welcome to my Nightmare - July 21, 2008
  24. Proprietary software? Counsel objects - July 17, 2008
  25. Desktop Distros* - July 14, 2008
  26. Linux is a tool* - July 8, 2008
  27. Penumbra Overture - If You Dare - July 5, 2008
  28. On OpenSuse 11* - July 1, 2008
  29. Battle of the Titans - Mandriva vs openSUSE: The Rematch - June 25, 2008
  30. New media center OS is pleasing to the eye and ear - June 23, 2008
  31. Kudos to openSUSE 11.0 - June 20, 2008
  32. Tuxpaint is fun for kids and adults - June 9, 2008
  33. Openoffice.org mailing labels solution* - June 8, 2008
  34. A Tiny Look at TinyMe 2008.0 - May 25, 2008
  35. No is Ark verdict - May 21, 2008
  36. New group advocates for FOSS in libraries - May 19, 2008
  37. Hardy Heron converts an Ubuntu skeptic - May 9, 2008
  38. Top 5 Tiny Distros - May 3, 2008
  39. New SymphonyOne distro plays a different tune - Apr 30, 2008
  40. First look at Draco GNU/Linux 0.3 - Apr 21, 2008
  41. PCLinuxOS Gnome links two worlds - Apr 10, 2008
  42. First look at Dreamlinux 3.0 - Apr 07, 2008
  43. GoblinX packs a lot into compact Slackware-based distro - Mar 21, 2008
  44. Drupal keeps getting better - Mar 20, 2008
  45. First look at PC-BSD 1.5 - Mar 17, 2008
  46. Latest Slax release needs more time in the oven - Mar 04, 2008
  47. Parsix: Persian distro makes GNOME look good - Feb 25, 2008
  48. Create a backup server with Restore - Feb 19, 2008
  49. Vector Linux 5.9: Light, fast Slackware-based distro* - Feb 13, 2008
  50. First look at Zenwalk Linux 5.0 - Feb 11, 2008
  51. Litrix: Linux from Brazil to your desktop - Jan 24, 2008
  52. SimplyMEPIS 7.0 is a keeper - Jan 18, 2008
  53. KDE 4.0: Everything that has an end, has a beginning* - Jan 18, 2008
  54. Osmo: A daily organizer - Jan 09, 2008

* - Posts by other contributers.





More in Tux Machines

A Setback for FOSS in the Public (War) Sector, CONNECT Interoperability Project Shifting to the Private Sector

  • GAO: DoD Not Fully Implementing Open-Source Mandates

    The Department of Defense has not fully implemented mandates from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the 2018 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) to increase its use of open-source software and release code, according to a September 10 Government Accountability Office (GAO) report. The report notes that the 2018 NDAA mandated DoD establish a pilot program on open source and a report on the program’s implementation. It also says that OMB’s M-16-21 memorandum requires all agencies to release at least 20 percent of custom-developed code as open-source, with a metric for calculating program performance. However, DoD has released less than 10 percent of its custom code, and had not developed a measure to calculate the performance of the pilot program. In comments to GAO, the DoD CIO’s office said there has been difficulty inventorying all of its custom source code across the department, and disagreement on how to assess the success for a performance measure. While the department worked to partially implement OMB’s policy, the department had not yet issued a policy.

  • Pentagon moves slowly on open-source software mandate amid security concerns

    The Defense Department has been slow to meet a government-wide mandate to release more open-source software code, as DOD officials have concerns about cybersecurity risks and are struggling to implement such a program across the department, according to a new audit.

  • DOD struggles to implement open source software pilots

    The Department of Defense’s congressionally mandated efforts to create an open source software program aren’t going so well. DOD must release at least 20 percent of its custom software as open source through a pilot required by a 2016 Office of Management and Budget directive and the 2018 National Defense Authorization Act. Open source software, OMB says, can encourage collaboration, “reduce costs, streamline development, apply uniform standards, and ensure consistency in creating and delivering information.”

  • DOD drags feet with open-source software program due to security, implementation concerns

    The Defense Department has been slow to meet a government-wide mandate to release more open-source software code, as DOD officials have concerns about cybersecurity risks and are struggling to implement such a program across the department, according to a new audit. Since 2016, DOD has been required by law to implement an open-source software pilot program in accordance with policy established by the Office of Management and Budget.

  • DOD pushes back on open source
  • DOD pushes back on open source
  • CONNECT Interoperability Project Shifting to the Private Sector

    The CONNECT project, an open source project that aims to increase interoperability among organizations, is transitioning from federal stewardship to the private sector and will soon be available to everyone. Developed ten years ago by a group of federal agencies in the Federal Health Architecture (FHA), CONNECT was a response to ONC’s original approach to a health information network. The agencies decided to build a joint health interoperability solution instead of having each agency develop its own custom solution, and they chose to make the project open source.

Android Leftovers

Linux VR Headset

Since most VR Headsets support Windows platforms today, there are very few options for Linux users. Despite its support, many people have faced troubles setting up and running their Headsets on Linux. However, not anymore. The VR gaming experience is now getting better! The all-new Xrdesktop is an open-source development that lets you work with various desktop environments like GNOME and KDE. Since this project is under progress right now, we can hope for more features like Steam, Valve and other platforms for gaming and Virtual Reality experience. In addition, the Xrdesktop will also offer integration with Windows as well. Once completed, it will be a great step towards traditional Linux desktop environments. The program is available for installation in both packages for Ubuntu Linux and Arch Linux. Read more

An Easy Fix for a Stupid Mistake

I waited a long time for Mageia 7 and for OpenMandriva Lx 4. When both distros arrived, I was very happy. But new distros bring changes, and sometimes it is not easy to adapt. Mageia 7 has been rock-solid: it is doing a great job in my laptop and both in my daughter's desktop and in mine. There is one thing, though. I have been avoiding a strange mesa update that wants to remove Steam. OpenMandriva is also fantastic, but this new release provided options like rock, release, and rolling. When I first installed the distro, I chose rock because I was shying away from the rolling flavor. Eventually, I had to move to rolling because that was the only way in which I could manage to install Steam in both my laptop and desktop machines. Read more