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Articles from 2008

This began as a list of original articles found on tuxmachines.org, either by me or someone else, but it has since morphed into a list of original articles found on tuxmachines.org and the articles I've had published elsewhere.

  1. Why the world isn't ready for Linux* - Dec 30, 2008
  2. My New Laptop and Linux* - Dec 25, 2008
  3. Revised Slackware keeps it simple - Dec 23, 2008
  4. openSUSE 11.1 makes Christmas come early - Dec 18, 2008
  5. The State of UK Terrestrial Web TV* - Dec 15, 2008
  6. How about "just using" instead of "migrating"?* - Dec 12, 2008
  7. Meet PCLinuxOS 2009 (Beta 1) - Oct 18, 2008
  8. Foresight Kid's can inspire young minds - Oct 09, 2008
  9. Sidux grows on you - Oct 08, 2008
  10. What Using Linux Means to Me* - Oct 06, 2008
  11. Why I Choose Linux* - Oct 06, 2008
  12. What I wish I'd read months ago about KDE3 vs. KDE4* - Oct 02, 2008
  13. Mandriva 2009/KDE 4.1 Revisited* - Sep 27, 2008
  14. The worlds best Linux Distro is now available* - Sep 26, 2008
  15. Michael Larabel talks about Phoronix - Sep 15, 2008
  16. Some Reasons NOT to use Linux. Ever. At all.* - Sep 11, 2008
  17. Dell Mini 9....* - Sep 09, 2008
  18. Linux-powered LinPC desktop is a bargain - Sep 08, 2008
  19. Mandriva 2009 Beta 1 & KDE 4.1 - A Brief Report* - Aug 15, 2008
  20. Gentoo 2008.0: Return to greatness? - Aug 7, 2008
  21. Parsix GNU/Linux 1.5r1 - Aug 04, 2008
  22. Tux's Dream* - July 25, 2008
  23. Welcome to my Nightmare - July 21, 2008
  24. Proprietary software? Counsel objects - July 17, 2008
  25. Desktop Distros* - July 14, 2008
  26. Linux is a tool* - July 8, 2008
  27. Penumbra Overture - If You Dare - July 5, 2008
  28. On OpenSuse 11* - July 1, 2008
  29. Battle of the Titans - Mandriva vs openSUSE: The Rematch - June 25, 2008
  30. New media center OS is pleasing to the eye and ear - June 23, 2008
  31. Kudos to openSUSE 11.0 - June 20, 2008
  32. Tuxpaint is fun for kids and adults - June 9, 2008
  33. Openoffice.org mailing labels solution* - June 8, 2008
  34. A Tiny Look at TinyMe 2008.0 - May 25, 2008
  35. No is Ark verdict - May 21, 2008
  36. New group advocates for FOSS in libraries - May 19, 2008
  37. Hardy Heron converts an Ubuntu skeptic - May 9, 2008
  38. Top 5 Tiny Distros - May 3, 2008
  39. New SymphonyOne distro plays a different tune - Apr 30, 2008
  40. First look at Draco GNU/Linux 0.3 - Apr 21, 2008
  41. PCLinuxOS Gnome links two worlds - Apr 10, 2008
  42. First look at Dreamlinux 3.0 - Apr 07, 2008
  43. GoblinX packs a lot into compact Slackware-based distro - Mar 21, 2008
  44. Drupal keeps getting better - Mar 20, 2008
  45. First look at PC-BSD 1.5 - Mar 17, 2008
  46. Latest Slax release needs more time in the oven - Mar 04, 2008
  47. Parsix: Persian distro makes GNOME look good - Feb 25, 2008
  48. Create a backup server with Restore - Feb 19, 2008
  49. Vector Linux 5.9: Light, fast Slackware-based distro* - Feb 13, 2008
  50. First look at Zenwalk Linux 5.0 - Feb 11, 2008
  51. Litrix: Linux from Brazil to your desktop - Jan 24, 2008
  52. SimplyMEPIS 7.0 is a keeper - Jan 18, 2008
  53. KDE 4.0: Everything that has an end, has a beginning* - Jan 18, 2008
  54. Osmo: A daily organizer - Jan 09, 2008

* - Posts by other contributers.





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  • Book review – Effective Python, by Brett Slatkin (and a free chapter for download)

    Those among you who have already learned some Python or may even have used it in some projects will certainly have heard the expression “Pythonic Code”, which conveys a general and somewhat wide meaning of “clean code and good software development practices in the context of Python”. With Effective Python, the author presents you with nothing less than 90 practical examples on how to adopt a pythonic developer mindset and how to write better Python code.

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  • Python Community Interview With David Amos

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  • PyCharm 2020.3 EAP – Starts now!

    The Early Access Program for our next major release, PyCharm 2020.3, is now open! If you are always looking forward to the next ‘big thing’ we encourage you to join the program and share your thoughts on the latest PyCharm improvements! [...] If you’re on Ubuntu 16.04 or later, you can use snap to get PyCharm EAP and stay up to date. You can find the installation instructions on our website.

  • Extracting two SDF data items with chemfp's text toolkit

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  • Talk Python to Me: #283 Web scraping, the 2020 edition

    Web scraping is pulling the HTML of a website down and parsing useful data out of it. The use-cases for this type of functionality are endless. Have a bunch of data on governmental sites that are only listed online in HTML without a download? There's an API for that! Do you want to keep abreast of what your competitors are featuring on their site? There's an API for that. Need alerts for changes on a website, for example enrollment is now open at your college and you want to be first to get in and avoid the 8am Monday morning course slot? There's an API for that. That API is screen scraping and Attila Tóth from ScrapingHub is here to tell us all about it.

Screencasts and Audiocasts: Linux Lite 5.2 RC1, TLLTS, Tiling Window Managers, Destination Linux, FLOSS Weekly

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  • The Dishonest Criticisms Against Tiling Window Managers

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  • Destination Linux 192: Super Productivity Interview & Big Updates On Nvidia Buying ARM

    This week the DL Triforce brings to an Interview with the developer of Super Productivity, a To-Do App for Linux. There’s a lot of new updates in the Nvidia Acquisition of ARM and how RISC-V might come into play. We’re also going to ask some Community Feedback including a question about why we wouldnt use BSD if Linux wasn’t available. The we discuss Xfce’s upcoming 4.16 release. In the Gaming section this week we get you prepped for a spooky Halloween and we talk about the new DLN Xonotic Server. Later in the show we’ll give you our popular tips/tricks and software picks. Plus so much more, coming up right now on Destination Linux.

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Android Leftovers