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today's odds & ends

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News
  1. Noteworthy Cooker changes (15 June – 26 July 2009)

  2. 10 Reasons Why Africans Should Try Ubuntu
  3. Kopete Plugin Adds Account Assistant
  4. KDE4.3 in Kubuntu
  5. Tycoon Games releases Bionic Heart for Mac, PC, Linux systems
  6. Wookie widget server to incubate at Apache
  7. Future of Linux in Automotive Industry
  8. Ten years after: An Interview with MontaVista's Jim Ready
  9. Computer Memory - How Much Is Good Enough?
  10. Wallpaper a Day - Day 1
  11. Wallpaper a Day - Day 2
  12. Some improvements for Gentoo safety
  13. Create Oscar-Worthy Movie Scripts With Celtx
  14. Mrs Martin, she annoys me
  15. Security vs. Convenience
  16. Chrome to be Built with 3D Hardware Acceleration Plug-in
  17. Red Hat offers a tip of the fedora to Microsoft … oh really?
  18. SFLC: Microsoft violated the GPL
  19. What Linux really lacks
  20. Canonical’s Ubuntu Partner Program: Moves Worth Watching
  21. Parsing the Microsoft - EU Interoperability Commitment
  22. DON'T MISS: Red Hat boot camp
  23. Fedora 12 Picks Up Another Batch Of Features
  24. Miro Media Player Gets an Overhaul




Not fame

There was no need to build a new kernel in order to release firefox-3.0.12 in SL! Where have you found the awkward idea that "Firefox rpm packages may have to be fixed as usual at the kernel level"?! What do you mean by "as usual"? Whose "usual"?

I don't need that kind of fame, but I am pissed off by certain remarks I don't find fair. (Obviously, I then can't keep quiet.)

OTOH, Caitlyn Martin is much more experienced with Red Hat than I am.

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