Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Feeling secure

Filed under
Mac

Last week’s column seemed to generate a lot of angry e-mails (read: zero), so I felt the need to clear up a point I made about computers.

I wrote about how furious I was to see people buying cheap laptops at Wal-Mart and it needs to be stated that I love (read: hate) Wal-Mart. I also want to make it clear that I love (see previous) Windows PCs.

But today I have a confession to make that may stun (read: not surprise at all) you, the reader.
I am a Mac user. I have been my entire life, ever since the Performa 575 that I’m sure is still collecting dust in the back room (read: may have been scrapped for parts).

Full Story.

Meh.

The guys writing style is great (read: annoying as hell). He's on topic and really funny (read: not another mac/pc/linux/os of the week comparison article). I hope the guy writes more computer stuff, he clearly is an expert (read: NOT).

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Open source history, present day, and licensing

Looking at open source softwares particularly, this is a fact that is probably useful to you if you are thinking about business models, many people don't care about it anymore. We talk about FOSS, Free and Open Source Software, but if we really are strict there's a difference between free software and open source software. On the left, I have free software which most typically is GPL software. Software where the license insures freedom. It gives freedoms to you as a user, but it also requires that the freedoms are maintained. On the right-hand side, you have open source software which is open for all, but it also allows you to close it. So here we come back to the famous clause of the GPL license, the reciprocity requirement which says, "If I am open, you need to be open." So software that comes under the GPL license carries with it something that other people call a virus. I call it a blessing because I think it's great if all software becomes open. Read more

Mozilla Wants to Save the Open Web, but is it Too Late?

Again, I think this is absolutely correct. But what it fails to recognise is that one of the key ways of making the Web medium "less free and open" is the use of legally-protected DRM. DRM is the very antithesis of openness and of sharing. And yet, sadly, as I reported back in May, Mozilla has decided to back adding DRM to the Web, starting first with video (but it won't end there...) This means Mozilla's Firefox is itself is a vector of attack against openness and sharing, and undermines its own lofty goals in the Open Web Fellows programme. Read more

Open source is starting to make a dent in proprietary software fortunes

Open source has promised to unseat proprietary competitors for decades, but the cloud may make the threat real. Read more

Chakra-2014.09-Euler released

The Chakra team is happy to announce the first release of the Chakra Euler series, which will follow the 4.14 KDE releases. A noticeable change in this release is the major face-lift of Kapudan, which now gives the option to users to enable the [extra] repository during first boot so they can easily install the most popular GTK-based applications. Kudos to george2 for the development and Malcer for the artwork. Read more