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Fluxbox In-Depth: Mad Customization And Other Tips

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Fluxbox

When I was first preparing to switch to Linux many years ago, I went into research mode and looked around the net a bit. At the time, part of the allure of Linux were the crazy cool desktops people had. After I switched I tried Gnome, then KDE, and was depressed at how uncool and *dozelike they were. Eventually, I discovered that all those amazing desktops were the result of Fluxbox (or the other *box forks). I switched immediately.

To my surprise, I found that not only was I able to get a really cool appearance, but Fluxbox made all the things I wanted out of a window manager, and some I didn’t know I wanted, simple. It turned out that I was not the only user to have noticed those operating system limitations and failings I’d been grumbling about for years, particularly with *doze. The Fluxbox crew apparently knew my pain and had gone about addressing all of those complaints.

Fluxbox, like many other window managers these days, allows for having multiple desktops. In Fluxbox these are called “Workspaces.” I usually use five workspaces, each devoted to separate purposes, and thus, each have specific applications. Let me describe them for you, but first let me note that all my workspaces are two monitors wide despite some images being cropped to show only the primary left-hand monitor.

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