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Buddi: Personal finances without a headache

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Software

Although the idea of using an application to manage your personal finances does make a lot of sense, not all of us have the time and patience to learn all the intricacies of tools like GnuCash or Money Manager Ex. In this case, you need Buddi, probably the most easy to use personal finance manager out there. Written in Java, Buddi runs on most platforms with Java Runtime Environment installed. If you are running Debian or Ubuntu, you can download and install a .deb package; otherwise you can opt for a plain .jar file that will run on pretty much any Linux distro.

To launch Buddi, use the java -jar Buddi-x.x.x.x.jar command. When the application is up and running, it immediately prompts you to create a new data file, and there are two things you should keep in mind here. First of all, it’s a good idea to place the data file in a separate directory, so when Buddi generates reports and graphs they are neatly stored in the same location as the main file. More importantly, you should encrypt your data file to make sure that nobody else can access your financial data. After you’ve created the data file, you are dropped into Buddi’s main window consisting of four tabs.

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Also: Digitalizing My Personal Finances on Linux

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