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Antix M8.2; comparison to Linux Mint

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I have an old pc, it's from 2005. I mostly use Linux mint on all my PC's at school, but on my home PC it was getting rather slow and hoggy. I knew it was time to switch.

My first thought was Puppy, but that is not debian based, and I have strange experiences with it. (random reboots and such). Then I thought of Arch. I like the idea of a rolling release distro, but I don't know if arch has wvdial, and again, it is not debian based. Then there is DSL, but I just do not like it. Feather linux has not been updated for a long time, so that falls of also.

But then a friend of mine said: Ever heard of Mepis and PClinuxOS? They both have a special distro for old pc's (tinyme and Antix). So I looked for tinyme, but you cannot download it at the moment.

Then I googled for Antix, and I fell in love at the moment I saw the screenshots. The iso is around 450 MByte big, so I left my PC on downloading the night, and in the morning it was finished.

rest here




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The saga continues with Slackware 14.2

Slackware is the oldest surviving Linux distribution and has been maintained since its birth by Patrick Volkerding. Slackware has a well deserved reputation for being stable, consistent and conservative. Slackware is released when it is ready, rather than on a set schedule, and fans of the distribution praise its no-frills and no-fuss design. Slackware adheres to a "keep it simple" philosophy similar to Arch Linux, in that the operating system does not do a lot of hand holding or automatic configuration. The user is expected to know what they are doing and the operating system generally stays out of the way. The latest release of Slackware, version 14.2, mostly offers software updates and accompanying hardware support. A few new features offer improved plug-n-play support for removable devices and this release of Slackware ships with the PulseAudio software. PulseAudio has been commonly found in the audio stack of most Linux distributions for several years, but that is a signature of Slackware: adding new features when they are needed, not when they become available. In this case PulseAudio was required as a dependency for another package. Slackware 14.2 is available in 32-bit and 64-bit builds for the x86 architecture. There is also an ARM build. While the main edition of Slackware is available as an installation disc only, there is a live edition of Slackware where we can explore a Slackware-powered desktop environment without installing the distribution. The live edition can be found on the Alien Base website. Both the live edition and the main installation media are approximately 2.6GB in size. For the purposes of this review I will be focusing on the main, installation-only edition. Booting from the install media brings us to a text screen where we are invited to type in any required kernel parameters. We can press the Enter key to take the default settings or wait two minutes for the media to continue booting. A text prompt then offers to let us load an alternative keyboard layout or use the default "US" layout. We are then brought to a text console where a brief blurb offers us tips for setting up disk partitions and swap space. The helpful text says we can create partitions and then run the system installer by typing "setup". Read more