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The problem of starting linux

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Linux

I was recently reading a discussion on the release of Windows 7. The article went into detail when it came to the different versions that will be sold. There will be 7. In the comment-section, I noted quite a lot of people arguing that this is too much to choose from for home users. Well then, let’s take those people’s vision and apply it to the world of Linux.

Let’s go on a journey with someone eager to start using Linux (without a live cd).

Let’s say this is one of the wonderfull people informing themselves before they actually start doing something. Then this user would trigger a search query on his favorite search engine for the value Linux. Linux.org is probably the first link that will be hit, as the first result has a 42% chance of getting selected. On Linux.org he/she’ll be learning a little on the principles of linux and the GNU licence. After a bit of reading, she’ll know how wonderful linux is and appreciate the idea of openness. As our imaginary person has a simple old spare computer that can be used to testdrive linux, he/she is convinced and ready to download her own copy.

But there is the first problem: Which linux distribution?

On the linux.org page, there are currently 220 listed distro’s to choose from. So now he/she can start reading all 220 items, but that’s just not done. The most probable way to get around the pile of different distro’s, will be asking around witch one is the “best one” to use.

rest here




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