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TI to use MontaVista Linux for digital video chips

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Linux

Phone and small consumer electronic manufacturers are always looking for a way to cut costs and reduce development time. Traditionally, the Symbian or Windows Mobile operating system was used to power these small devices, but now TI has teamed up with MontaVista Linux to provide a third alternative. The two companies will launch the DaVinci development platform and Linux programmers will be able to use standard Linux APIs to program TI's digital video chips.

The chips carrying the model numbers TMS320DM6443/6446 are single chip solutions that combine processor, digital-video encoding/decoding and network interfaces into one package. The processors may not make sense in the desktop world, but embedded platforms or mobile devices can use such a setup to reduce power consumption and cost. According to Oren Teich, Director of Product Management at MontaVista Linux, the challenge is getting an operating system to work on such chips and then making software development as easy as possible.

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