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Linux Social Experiment…People have NO clue

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Misc

The idea came to me while I was helping my daughter with her homework. There was no direct reason why I should have come up with the idea during that event. It was just a random thought on which I followed through. What if I were to stand on a street corner with a sign in MY hand? One in which did not ask for money, food, a job or sympathy, but offered to give people something for free? What if I offered people waiting at the stoplight of a busy intersection free Linux disks?

I spent the next two evenings burning disks, covers and putting them in cheap cases. I made 60 of them and put them in two shoe boxes. The next morning, I traveled about 3 miles to an intersection of William Cannon Blvd. and the I-35 feeder road. I parked my pickup truck in the Kmart parking lot and carried my stuff over to my corner. It was there I sat up shop at 7 AM.

Full Article.

Happy Ending

Glad to see your heart is in the right place.

As to your head, that's another story. Not sure your conclusion (People have no clue) is necessarily correct (although I often say that about people in general).

Would you install software that randomly appeared (say from a unsolicited email?). I'm guessing not. Why would ANYONE (clueless or otherwise) accept unknown software from an unknown person (scruffy looking or not).

I would say the opposite is true, people are finally getting a clue about the dangers of unknown email, unknown weblinks, and unknown software. Thank the virus writers and phishing scammers for that.

In this day and age, you're lucky someone didn't accept your gift, install in on their computer (completely hosing up their windows setup) and now has a team of lawyers looking for you to sue your ass.

Linux is not a religion, it's not money, it's not food. People do not NEED Linux. Those who want it have numerous sources to get it, attempting to force it on people (even in a completely passive way) just won't work.

Good job on the hands on experiment though, more people need to actually try things themselves instead of believing the status quo.

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