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The Sad Linux Facts

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Linux
Microsoft

This year marks my 10th year as a Linux user. So I guess you could call me a fan of Linux. Fan enough to be able to tell you: its not going to knock Microsoft off its dominate position in business IT.

The reason for this is the way Microsoft allows business decision makers to anticipate the rate of technical change. Most people in IT only seem to understand half the story. Technology offers the opportunity to increase productivity of workers giving firms larger profit margins for the same price.

But technology is expensive and risky. In the late 1990s many firms found they could have no confidence in their IT projects. Money spent on IT more likely than not never gave a return.

rest here




um

not sure if he has heard of a little company called RedHat.

Even Novell is making gains where even MS is falling back or staying consistent.

Both RedHat and Novell offer 'stable' products that do not change rapidly from one release to the next. While many bleeding edge geeks deride this as being 'slow' or 'old', it exactly fits the business model of keeping a pace that can be considered stable.

To that effect, Debian stable based servers and desktops accomplish the same.

let's not forget MS has other tools, also not related directly to IT that helps keep it in a majority position. such as proprietary patents and unethical business practices. (don't believe that? check out the E.U. and local patent suits filed against MS in just this past year. they are still at it, they just try to divert attention from it more0.

No, FOSS is gaining slowly but surely and I hope it never attains MS like majority status in the market. We do not need any more monopolies where consumers are devoid of options.

Big Bear

The Sad Linux Facts

Apparently this author thinks that stagnation is a virtue. A typical nothing "I use Linux but ..." post from the Microsoft world.

GregE
Melbourne, Australia

The sad linux FUD

LOL, this guy is a sharepoint consultant. I know his type - lots of microsoft fans have dabbled with linux over the years, but they really don't understand it. They are really not comfortable outside their familiar microsoft surroundings.

At any rate, his logic is as suspect as his affiliations. He drones on authoritatively that linux can't make any headway because business people distrust the long haired, sandal wearing linux geeks, because the linux geels loathe the dirty capitalists. Talk about tired - hey there guy, 1991 called and it wants its linux user stereotype back!

One can only conclude that he has never heard of such linux-oriented business concerns as red hat, novell, oracle, amazon, google, and parts of other firms such as Intel, IBM, HP, Fujitsu, etc....

Oh well, we can't let the facts get in the way of a smashing good story now, can we?

Lol, what a prat

How do you become a second life consultant!!!

This has to be be a hoax, surely.

Without doubt the most stupid post I have seen this year, and there have been a few.

It's worth noting his blog doesn't allow comments, I wonder why.

Cod Wink

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