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PhpDig excels at small Web site indexing

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HowTos

Webmasters looking to provide search capabilities for their site would do well to try out PhpDig, a Web spider and search engine written in PHP with a MySQL backend. There are other open source search engines, all of which have their own advantages. PhpDig just happens to suit the needs of my Information Technology for Greenhouses and Horticulture site. Here's how I got it working.

Webmasters with small sites know the problem of providing useful site search capabilities. Typically, visitors enter keywords in a search box and the search engine returns a ranked list of pages related to the query. This is a useful service -- provided the visitor can tune the search and the results returned are reliable and relevant.

Some Webmasters rely on Google for this service. A listing in Google or another mainstream engine is a must-have in practical terms, so it is easy enough to piggyback on the main engine with a site-specific search, provided Google understands your site and keeps coming back for updates -- but this isn't always the case.

Large search engines boast of indexing of billions of pages, but we are only interested in digesting a hundred pages or so. We need them indexed on a regular basis, daily or at least more often than Google might do it.

It is also important to know if our site is responding correctly by providing public pages, hiding private pages, and following links correctly. Since Google uses algorithms that it doesn't share, we have no way of predicting the indexing results or doing any testing in advance. Advance testing is useful if, for example, you have private files that you want to be sure will not be indexed, but you are relying on your robots.txt file to deny access to bots. If we make a spelling mistake in robots.txt, our private pages could go in Google's cache for the world to read. We also need to control what words are indexed and customize our own search and result pages.

Enter PhpDig.

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