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Review: Ubuntu 9.04

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Ubuntu

The most popular of the free Linux distros, the 10th and latest release of Ubuntu Linux (9.04, also known as Jaunty Jackalope) is available for both servers and desktops. Ready-made install media can be purchased online, along with chargeable support from commercial sponsor Canonical and others, however, we opted for the free download, choosing the 32-bit desktop edition supplied as a 699MB ISO CD image.

Once downloaded, we simply burned the image to a CD to create a LiveCD disk from which it is possible to evaluate Ubuntu without having to make any changes to the host computer. This worked well on the three PCs we tried, including a Dell Vostro notebook where the Ubuntu installer not only configured the display correctly but also the built-in WiFi adapter. Power management and hibernation options also worked as expected.

Once booted the LiveCD experience is much like running Ubuntu normally although, because files have to be fetched from the CD, a lot slower.

rest here




Printer Drivers?

I will forgive the author for reviewing Ubuntu 9.04 when 9.10 is only two months away and everyone else is reviewing alpha versions.

However, the author states that he had to "go hunting" for printer drivers. What might they be?? I have several printers. ALL will operate with Ubuntu and one, an older Epson, cannot be used at all with windows because there are no drivers!!

The author states that he had to "resort to the command line" to install some software but that software is not identified. In my experience the command line is necessary only for software still under development and is not all necessary for the average user.

Finally, the author claims that 9.04 is somehow inferior to beta releases of Windows 7. HUH??? I bought a new computer that came with Windows Vista. I immediately replaced that with Windows 7. I was pleased that the Windows 7 experience was much better than Vista but after 4 days I permanently removed Windows and installed Ubuntu 9.04. It's a good machine now.

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