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4 reasons why Apple is not criticized by Linux / Open Source proponents

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Mac
OSS

On Wednesday the 26th of August 2009, the Free Software Movement launched the Windows7sins site. This was just days before Apple released its Snow Leopard OS, prompting a lot of criticisms from some corners of the blogosphere that the FSF is giving Apple a free ride. I simply disagree with such criticisms for the following four reasons.

Reason 1 - Mac OS X is Open Source
Mac OS X is in full conformity with Unix OS and is built on Mach 3.0 and FreeBSD 5 comprising over a 100 Open Source products. Besides major components of Mac OS X, including the core UNIX, are made available under Apple’s Open Source license, allowing developers and students to view source code, learn from it and submit suggestions and modifications. Can anyone of those leveling criticisms against the FSF confidently say that about Microsoft? This alone is enough reason to give Apple a breathing space when it comes to Open Source! I don't think I can say that about Microsoft and their Windows OS.

Reason 2 - Size

rest here




re: Apple

Wow, what a complete load of crap.

Reason 1 - Mac OS X is Open Source
Huh? So where's my free copy of MentOS (the Mac equivilant of CentOs)? MacOS is complete closed - it might chose to use Open Source applications or components but in no way, shape, or form is it Open Source.

Reason 2 - Size
So no matter how evil, how closed, how limiting (after all microsoft is just software - apple is both software AND hardware) just because there not the "big guy" they get a free pass. Yeah, that's logical.

Reason 3 - Choice
"I have more choice when it comes to Apple than Microsoft."
Do I really even have to bother to explain whats wrong with that sentence?

Reason 4 Attitude
"Apple actively contributes to and respects that Open Source movements."
And that's proven how? Apple leachs from the open source projects but where (exactly) does it give back? And they don't even do that well. Remember the months of delay in fixing the DNS bug?

Apple is no better (or worse) then ANY OTHER proprietary software company. Which just points out that the whole Linux Fanboy Raving about Microsoft has nothing to do with reality and everything to do with the whole Linux is a Religion Bullshit mentality fostered by FSF and the Stallman ninnies.

One reason I do not despise

One reason I do not despise Apple but do MS is because we are all forced to pay for MS even if we not use it ourselves.

Ever time I pay my taxes a percentage of this is giving to Microsoft (not apple) through schools, hospitals (bearing in mind that recently hospitals in England have been grounded due to Windows Viruses) and the military - http://www.loosewireblog.com/2009/01/virus-hits-british-defences.html

At least if our taxes went to a Linux company the benefits would help the whole software industry rather than one company that produces the worst software (hoverer it can play games...)

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