Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

7 Reasons to Use Debian

Filed under

1. Stable
Any application needs time to be used and tested enough time in order to make it stable. One of the greatest goals of Debian is stability. It's released when it's ready and applications included in the repositories have enough time to be tested through.

2. Debian offers stable, old stable, testing, *and* sid
Why should this be an advantage? First, because there is a stable release, which will fit both desktops and servers. Since Debian stable releases happen rarely, software can get a little old. So any can get to choose 'testing', which is tagged that way because applications are tested more but they are still usable. Sid is bleeding edge, which means applications get in usually as soon as they are released, so you get the newest software only by installing a testing weekly snapshot and upgrading. Considering the stable and old stable offer software which has been tested and stripped for critical bugs, testing usually proves to be the perfect alternative for a user who wants to use up-to-date tools and applications, which include the latest features.

More in Tux Machines

Turris Omnia Is a Linux-Based Powerful Open Source Router That Updates on the Fly

Turris Omnia is a new open source router that comes with powerful hardware and a Linux distro based on OpenWRT. It’s a smashing hit on Indiegogo, and there is still time to get one. Read more

APT (Advanced Package Tool) 1.1 Is Now Stable in Debian

APT (Advanced Package Tool) is a famous set of core tools inside Debian that make it possible to install, remove, and keep applications up to date. The stable branch of APT has been finally upgraded with the version 1.3. Read more

Historians and detectives keep track of data with open source tool

Segrada is a piece of open source software that allows historians (and detectives) to keep track of their data. Unlike wikis or archival databases, its focus lies on information and interrelations within it. Pieces of information might represent persons, places, things, or concepts. These "nodes" can be bidirectionally connected with each other to semantically represent friendship, blood relation, whereabouts, authorship, and so on. Hence the term "semantic graph database," since information can be displayed as a graph of semantically connected nodes. Read more

today's leftovers