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Slackware 13.0 - ho hum

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Slackware. It's an institution in its own right. Some might argue that it's *put* people into institutions as well, out of either frustration or zealotry. Whatever your opinion may be about it, there's little doubt that it's a strong one.

My own opinions about it have certainly varied throughout the years. I can't decide if it's because Slackware is changing or I am. Perhaps there *is* no Slackware. Hmm...

Release 13 is noteworthy in that it's the first one to officially support the 64-bit X86_64 architecture, which is a good thing. Perhaps at some point in the near future all distributions will actually start exploiting the architecture to its fullest. Acceptance is the first step.


Much like Ben Stein's inflection or the uncoolness of Furries, the Slackware installer doesn't change. I think I can count on one hand the new things I've seen in it since I got started using Slack around version 7. I won't bother posting screenshots because there are probably hundreds if not thousands of them available on the web.

It's text-based with simple colored graphics via ncurses. If you're old enough to remember the DOS installer for DOOM, you know what I'm talking about.

rest here


Slackware has always been a distro that I’m not terribly fond of. I don’t like how difficult it is to set things up. This isn’t because I particularly mind editing config files, its because I want to be doing it on my terms and not because I have to.

Slackware 13.0

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