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10 Linux file managers worth checking out

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Software

Most users take their file managers for granted. It’s there, it does its job, and that’s all they care about. But to Linux users, the file manager is as close to their hearts as their text editor. There is a reason for this: With the Linux operating system, and the various desktops, there are quite a few file managers. Each has standard as well as unique features. In fact, there are so many file managers, and so many unique features, it’s time someone listed 10 of the best choices. See if one of these file managers meets (or surpasses) your needs.

1: Command line

Although the command line isn’t just a file manager, you can’t have a listing of Linux file management tools without including it Without these tools, working on headless servers would be a challenge (unless you’re using remote desktop). And being someone who cut his Linux teeth with the command line, not a day goes by where I do not use it for something. The tools you will use for file management in the command line include cd, mkdir, rm, ls, locate, find, cp, and mv.

2: Dolphin

Dolphin is the default file manager for KDE, which replaced Konqueror upon the arrival of KDE 4. Dolphin is a full-featured file manager and includes the standard features of a file manager and then some. You will also find Network transparency, undo, batch renaming, split views, dockable panels, built-in encryption, zoom drag bar, and much more. Dolphin will never offer the number of features included with Konqueror, which is precisely why the KDE team made the switch. Dolphin focuses on file management and file management alone. Konqueror focuses on everything — file management, browsing, document viewing. The KDE developers thought it best to simplify the task of file management. This was a good call on their part, especially for the new user. As a file manager, Konqueror was just too much.

3: Gnome Commander

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