Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Novell in the News

Filed under
SUSE

Industry observers will be looking for signs of whether the company's big bet on Linux is starting to pay off. So far Novell as had little to show even though the Linux market is booming. Industry watchers say Novell needs to more forcefully pull away from its proprietary software roots to win over open source supporters.

"I can't find any other companies that have ... leveraged an open source and proprietary model and been successful at making money at it," says John Enck.a vice president and research director at Gartner. "We remain skeptical on how a company can make money on open source other than services and maintenance."

Can Open Source Still Save Novell?

A month after slashing its global work force by 10 percent, Novell's fortunes show signs of rallying -- both at home and in an expanding overseas market.

Novell's flagship SuSE Linux Server product, a distant second to leading Linux-seller Red Hat in recent years, won 53 percent of the delegate vote at the LinuxWorld Conference & Expo in Frankfurt, Germany. Red Hat won 37 percent, while 8 percent went to the lesser-known Mandriva.

Novell Is Flush With Good News.

More in Tux Machines

FOSS Events: LCA and systemd.conf

  • 5 great linux.conf.au talks (that aren't about Linux)
    linux.conf.au, otherwise known as LCA, is one of the world's longest-running open source events. LCA has been held in a different city around Australia and New Zealand almost every year since 1999. Despite the name, linux.conf.au is a generalist open source conference. LCA hasn't been just about Linux for a long time. Rather, the conference focuses on everything to do with open source: the software, hardware, and network protocols that underly it. LCA also has a strong track on free and open culture, exploring how open source interacts with science, government, and the law.
  • FINAL REMINDER! systemd.conf 2016 CfP Ends on Monday!
    Please note that the systemd.conf 2016 Call for Participation ends on Monday, on Aug. 1st! Please send in your talk proposal by then! We’ve already got a good number of excellent submissions, but we are very interested in yours, too!

OSS Leftovers

Programming

Security News

  • Security advisories for Thursday
  • Please save GMane!
  • The End of Gmane?
    In 2002, I grew annoyed with not finding the obscure technical information I was looking for, so I started Gmane, the mailing list archive. All technical discussion took place on mailing lists those days, and archiving those were, at best, spotty and with horrible web interfaces. The past few weeks, the Gmane machines (and more importantly, the company I work for, who are graciously hosting the servers) have been the target of a number of distributed denial of service attacks. Our upstream have been good about helping us filter out the DDoS traffic, but it’s meant serious downtime where we’ve been completely off the Internet.
  • Pwnie Express makes IoT, Android security arsenal open source
    Pwnie Express has given the keys to software used to secure the Internet of Things (IoT) and Android software to the open-source community. The Internet of Things (IoT), the emergence of devices ranging from lighting to fridges and embedded systems which are connected to the web, has paved an avenue for cyberattackers to exploit.
  • The Software Supply Chain Is Bedeviled by Bad Open-Source Code [Ed: again, trace this back to FUD firms like Sonatype in this case]
    Open-source components play a key role in the software supply chain. By reducing the amount of code that development organizations need to write, open source enables companies to deliver software more efficiently — but not without significant risks, including defective and outdated components and security vulnerabilities.
  • Securing a Virtual World [Ed: paywall, undated (no year but reposted)]
  • Google tells Android's Linux kernel to toughen up and fight off those horrible hacker bullies
    In a blog post, Jeff Vander Stoep of the mobile operating system's security team said that in the next build of the OS, named Nougat, Google is going to be addressing two key areas of the Linux kernel that reside at the heart of most of the world's smartphones: memory protection and reducing areas available for attack by hackers.