Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Can Microsoft Ever Be Accepted by the Linux Community?

Filed under
Microsoft

Once, the CEO of the company for which I worked had a bright idea. He would sponsor a young open source software coder for the summer, and, in return, the coder would assign the copyright of his application to the company.

Fortunately, the young coder consulted some lawyers in his family, and refused. His application went on to become a basic tool in the administration of the free desktop. The company, like so many in the Dot-com era that tried to prey upon free software, went bankrupt. The last I heard, the CEO was a supplier to health food stores.

The situation was one of several that caused me to quit the company. But I have flashbacks whenever I see Microsoft maneuvering around free software. When Microsoft alternately tries to attack free software -- for instance, by attempting to sell patents that may affect Linux to patent trolls -- and to ingratiate itself -- for instance, by creating the open source CodePlex Foundation -- I see simply a large scale version of the CEO's behavior.

Both are examples of corporate efforts to exploit free and open source software (FOSS) without changing traditional business practices. Both exhibit a kind of arrogance, as though nobody has attempted such exploitation before -- and as though the community had its collective head too high in the clouds to understand what was being attempted.

rest here




nope

no.

I second that.

Simply, no.

Less simply, MS has too much of a history of trying to extinguish the competition. Many Linux users don't see Linux in competition with MS (we're free to choose!), but MS certainly does see it this way. MS cannot compete, they must destroy by any means necessary, and therefor will continue fighting Linux. Seasoned Linux users don't accept MS because we're using better products on our own terms. New Linux users also don't accept MS and will fight, for a while. But eventually there will be enough new Linux users who want these programs and will be accepting of MS and their closed, crappy software. I fear that day the most.

true dat

I cant stand MS, i just switched off of it completely two months ago with my new desktop build, MS is a giant monster that wants everything there way, they do dirty business such as the recent best buy thing, its not "dirty" but its filling people with lies. Same goes for Apple as well. The future is about being Open with open standards. Thats why linux rocks. and the new sony e reader haha.

re: Microsoft

Somehow with Linux's 1% desktop market share, I doubt Microsoft is losing sleep over it.

And don't confuse the IT Community (which is mostly made of real engineers, techs, managers, etc) with the religious-esque Linux Community (which is mostly made of Stallman-like flakes and fanboys).

The real IT community has no problem mixing Linux and Microsoft and any other OS. They know the ONLY thing that matters is getting the job done well, not wasting huge amounts of time arguing about which icon looks less ugly in Unoobtu, or if a manufacture (or vendor) is *sniff* making small children type code into rusty keyboards.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

KDE: Simple by Default, Powerful When Needed

KDE (back when it was still the name of the desktop environment) and our applications historically stood for powerful features and great flexibility and customizeability. This is what our users love about our software, this is why they choose Plasma and KDE software instead of one of the other Free desktop offerings. And it is also something they would fight tooth and nail for if we wanted to take it away (as many a KDE maintainer who dared to remove a feature he thought was unnecessary can tell). Read more

BitTorrent Bleep alpha released for Android

As an alpha it still has some issues “As with any Alpha, there are some known issues and bugs to work out. Android users will need to set the app to “Wi-Fi Only” unless you have an unlimited data plan; this is only for the time being while we iron out and issue related to battery and data-plan. And while you can move a username from desktop to mobile, Bleep does not yet support moving an existing account from Android to the desktop. And while you can receive messages on multiple devices; messages sent will not be seen across all devices. As with our previous release, communications happen only when all parties are online – you cannot send offline photos or group chats asynchronously.” Read more

During Akademy 2014

This year there were lot of fast track (10 minutes) talks on different areas around KDE. All of them were quite interesting, some of them are: Bruno Coudoin talked about how and why GCompris moved to QtQuick with the support of KDE. What all challenges project faced while moving from GTK to Qt. Daniel Vrátil talked about his one year journey with Akonadi Martin Gräßlin gave an overview of current state of Kwin in adding Wayland support and future plans. Kevin Ottens talked about KDE craftsmen where analysis was on the way we handle our software production, how can we make our software even better. Kai Uwe Broulik talked about current status of Qt port on Android and iOS. Currently, 3 iOS apps in Apple store and 8 Android apps in Google play since December 2013. Read more

Leftovers: Software