Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

A Taste of the Berry 0.65

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Berry Linux released version .65 yesterday or so and I thought I'd take a look. This release brings some updated applications and services, but overall, it's basically looks about the same with the same boot splash, kde splash and kitten wallpaper. This time we have linux 2.6.14.1, gcc 4.0.2, and KDE 3.5.

Berry is a livecd, appearing to be based on Knoppix startup scripts, yet it had fedora core packages. It is primarily for the Japanese language speaking world, but it has support for English as well. It is invoked at boot up with the option LANG=us. This is also where I put my "xmodule=vesa" or else Xorg 6.8.2 would lock up.

Berry is released in about a 450mb iso, featuring KDE as the default, if not only, desktop. The menu was quite limited as they had stripped kde to little more than the basics and then featured gaim (which would not open here), thunderbird and firefox (v1.5) as the primary internet applications. It did include gimp, which was good considering it didn't even have ksnapshot. There were a few configurations, some graphic applications, a few games, and some sound and video apps.

        

There were no common plugins or java support included, however the mplayer did a good job of playing movie files on hand. Demonstrated in the following screenshots are mplayer playing an avi, a mpeg, and a bin file.

        

Berry ships with OpenOffice.org 2.0, PlanMaker demo, and TextMaker demo. I always liked the *Makers because despite their wonderful functionality and built-in features, they are quite lightweight and small in size. I can even run them on my old laptop. The only drawbacks for the given market are they aren't open sourced, lack the really advanced functions I'd never use, and cost like 50 bucks for the full version. Actually the demos are the full versions, they are just time-limited.

    

Berry comes with its own Berry Control Center. It's not too extensive at this time, but it does include a netconfig, hostname config, and a package updater. It is an attractive piece of software, perhaps they plan to add more features as time goes by.

        

There was a hard drive installer included as well. It was the Kanotix hard drive installer that we've seen before in symphony, kurumin, and very similar to arabian's. If you've not see it, it basically walks the user through the configuration by asking a few simple questions. The full process is shown in the screenshots. It worked good and completed the install without incident here today.

        

Hardware detection was a bit spotty as well. Artsd didn't function at all although it appeared some snd_emu10k1 drivers were inserted. It detected my crt-1 first before (actually instead of) my crt-0 which put the wrong modelines and resolution in the xorg.conf file. Given this, I was stuck in 1024x768. My webcam and bttv are rarely if ever detected properly. It did not see my printer at all, as if it wasn't even connected and turned on. I didn't check on the scanner, but then again, I didn't see any software for it anyway.

The list of applications were limited but Berry Linux is a nice little distro featuring a pretty look and some necessary basics. I congratulate and thank any developer for making Linux available to other languages and Berry's a great effort for the Japanese market. More Screenshots.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Unix Philosophy Is More Than Just A Simple Slogan
  • KDE’s Akademy 2020 – A Quick Summary

    Akademy is the yearly conference for the KDE community, which is a community devoted to creating free software for desktop and mobile. Typically, Akademy takes place in a different city each year. However, due to the pandemic, the conference was online this time around. September 4-11 marked the dates of Akademy 2020.

  • openmediavault 5.5.11
  • Brackets

    There is a new application available for Sparkers: Brackets

  • 10 Years of OpenStack – SeongSoo Cho at NHN / OpenStack Korea User Group

    Happy 10 years of OpenStack! Millions of cores, 100,000 community members, 10 years of you. Storytelling is one of the most powerful means to influence, teach, and inspire the people around us. To celebrate OpenStack’s 10th anniversary, we are spotlighting stories from the individuals in various roles from the community who have helped to make OpenStack and the global Open Infrastructure community successful.

  • Developing a WordPress Website Without Programming Knowledge

    WordPress is the solution to those who want to create websites but have minimal programming and coding experience. If you’ve heard that expression multiple times, why not check it out at least once? You don’t need to worry about your programming skills, since this powerful Content Management System (CMS) can be easily used by a layman to create stunning websites. However, you will need to understand the way WordPress functions as there are two WordPress versions that you can work with, and all that can be a bit confusing. In this article, we shall look at WordPress from a beginner or a novice’s perspective and determine whether it’s truly easy to learn. Let’s get started.

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (inspircd and modsecurity), Fedora (chromium, cryptsetup, gnutls, mingw-libxml2, and seamonkey), openSUSE (ark, chromium, claws-mail, docker-distribution, fossil, hylafax+, inn, knot, libetpan, libjpeg-turbo, libqt4, librepo, libvirt, libxml2, lilypond, mumble, openldap2, otrs, pdns-recursor, perl-DBI, python-Flask-Cors, singularity, slurm_18_08, and virtualbox), SUSE (jasper, less, ovmf, and rubygem-actionview-4_2), and Ubuntu (sa-exim).

  • Seungha Yang: Continuing to make GStreamer more Windows-friendly [Ed: step forward?]

    GStreamer 1.18 includes various exciting features especially new Windows plugins: Direct3D11, Media Foundation, UWP support, DXGI desktop capture and rewrite of the WASAPI audio plugin using Windows 10 APIs.

  • A recipe for presenting at the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women – Ideas, dedication and a dash of energy

    One professional milestone for developers as they get more experience is to present at a major technical conference. To evolve from passionate conference attendee to conference session presenter is a huge step that not only requires technical chops, but also important soft skills like public presentation, writing, and communications. We sat down with two mid-career developers, Megan Kostick and Cindy Lu as they were preparing for the upcoming, Grace Hopper Celebration in the fall of 2020. Here’s a quick peek into the whats, whys, hows and lessons learned in presenting at a major technical conference! [...] Megan: IBM recently launched Developer Advocacy as its own career path and being part of the Developer Advocacy organization here at IBM, Cindy and I thought we could bring some light to this emerging role and give individuals of all technical levels a chance to learn about another career option that may not have been on their radar screen. GHC is traditionally a very big networking and hiring event for college students and just maybe our talk will get some future new hires interested in pursuing developer advocacy as a potential career. Or influence mid-level to senior-level developers that would like a change of pace. It’s always fun to share insider tips as well to help others be successful and grow.

today's howtos

Programming Leftovers

  • Top 10 Natural Language Processing Tools For Today's Demand
  • The Rust Programming Language Blog: Call for 2021 Roadmap Blogs Ending Soon

    We will be closing the collection of blog posts on October 5th. As a reminder, we plan to close the survey on September 24th, later this week.

  • Python Practice Problems: Get Ready for Your Next Interview

    Are you a Python developer brushing up on your skills before an interview? If so, then this tutorial will usher you through a series of Python practice problems meant to simulate common coding test scenarios. After you develop your own solutions, you’ll walk through the Real Python team’s answers so you can optimize your code, impress your interviewer, and land your dream job!

  • Learn to Code Free — Our Interactive Courses Are ALL Free This Week!

    Exciting news: for the next week, all courses are free. Yup, every single course in every learning path is free from Sept 21-28. This free week includes all of our courses in R, Python, SQL, machine learning, Git, the command line, and much more! Even more exciting: complete at least one mission during this week and you'll unlock an additional prize: a downloadable data science career resources pack sent to your email! Now, it’s easier than ever to go from total beginner to job-qualified using Dataquest. The paywall is down!

  • Molfile "S SKP"

    In the last couple of essays I described some of the parts of a SDF record then pointed out some of the ways to break simple SDF record tokenizers. In this essay I'll point out an documentation curiosity which makes it even harder to parse a molfile with simple tools, though until I wrote this essay I had never seen it in actual use.

Games: Unity, Super Slap Sisters, Ayo the Clown and Steam News Hub

  • Unity 2020.2 Bringing Some Hefty Performance Optimizations [Ed: Microsoft Mono unfortunately]

    Not only did Unity Software experience a successful IPO last week but they also rolled out the Unity 2020.2 engine into public beta and with that comes some "major speed-ups" for performance.

  • Super Slap Sisters [Ed: Requires WINE]

    These are some great additions that allow for an even wider variety of playstyles, keeping your opponent guessing as to when the best time to strike is. For example, not only can the clutch be used during an attack to throw your opponent off, it can also be a lifesaver just as you’re about to reach the blastzone (knockout boundaries) after getting hit. The clutch will reverse your momentum, meaning that the sooner you perform the clutch after flying, the closer you’ll get to the stage and therefore have a more successful recovery. Players who are new to this type of fighting will not be left in the dark here, as there is a great tutorial mode. The tutorial is very interactive with the player, giving them everything they need to get a basic grasp on how the game works. You can also read about the various mechanics that are available in-game, what they do, and how to do it, as well as get a bio on each character and what their moves entail.

  • Go on an epic quest as a not-so-average clown trying to find their dog in Ayo the Clown

    Ayo the Clown is an upcoming adventure platformer from developer Cloud M1, it should be releasing this year and it looks so full of charm it could pop like a balloon at any moment. Funded on Kickstarter back in September 2019 with 475 backers pledging $20,397 we totally missed this, it even had a Linux demo back then too. Cloud M1 said their take on the busy platformer genre is one that's supposed to "reintroduce you to the incredibly fun platformer games of the ‘90s where platforming is accompanied by an inspiring and memorable story". It has a pretty amazing style, one you can easily say is quite Nintendo-like.

  • Valve rolls out News Channels onto Steam to follow your favourite curators - like us!

    Over time Steam continues to grow as much more than just a games store, and Valve are showing how today with their next Steam Labs experiment to let you get your news. Steam Labs Experiment 009 announced here is an addition to the News Hub, which is now hooked up with the Steam Curator system. Valve said it's now nearing completion and it's a big stop towards the full launch. This will presumably replace the old Steam news feed.