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REVIEW SUSE Linux 10.0

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SUSE

The Holy Grail of Linux is to be so easy to install and use that the technologically illiterate can do it. The penguin community is working feverishly to this goal, which would give Microsoft's Windows a run for its money.

It's almost there.

So far, I've had effortless installs from the old Lindows and Xandros, and was expecting much the same from SUSE 10.0, from Novell. All the reviews I've read of SUSE 10.0 (supported version: $84 Cdn., non-supported version is free ) reported having no problems - but I did.

Full Story.

my experiences with Suse 10

I have used Linspire 5.0 in the past this year and have installed and am currently using Suse 10 evaluation version. I intend to buy the commercial version when 10.1 comes out about March. I should first start out by telling you that I bought my computer pre-installed with Linspire and every part of it fully supports Linux and it is a new computer with a Celeron D and 512 MB of RAM.

I have a flat panel LCD monitor and had no problems with getting it to work although the fonts don't always display cleanly and it took me a while to get my eyes adjusted to the different calibration or setting it took some time or some of both. I noticed I wasn't able to get the DVD evaluation version to work on my machine but the CD-ROM set worked fine.

I definitely don't recommend Suse to newbies although it is very easy for me to use as I was able to install Linux back when you needed to know all your hardware and the installers were all text based, and plug-n-play support was new, but I was able to get it up and running and was able to do some crude graphical web design. That was in the spring of 1999-2001.

I have since used Windows ME and then switched to OS X (10.2-10.3) and still use my Mac in a few areas like support for Comcast. Although Comcast does work with Suse and Linspire - you just need a Mac or Windows to register your modem when you get a new modem or move.

Anyway I liked some aspects of Linspire like the one click install, but I did not want to depend on one small company to get the software I needed and I wanted to be able to download the files and install them later if for some reason my computer is passed by in system requirements and they stop supporting the version I am using. I also wanted to try out Suse as I have used Mandriva (in 1999-2001) and used Linspire for several months. I wanted to try out the other major consumer desktop Linux. I am also looking forward to trying out Desktop BSD or PC-BSD.

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