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Getting Stanford's "Karel the Robot" to Run in Debian's Eclipse

I’m taking Stanford’s Open Courseware “Programming Methodology” this semester, but I got stumped early on by the problem of setting up the special Stanford class libraries in my Debian-standard Eclipse installation. The instructions and files available from the website are only available for Windows and Macintosh platforms. The process is not that hard, but if you’re new to Java and Eclipse (and especially if you are new to programming, as the class assumes), you’ll likely be thrown by this. I couldn’t find any documentation on how to do this after extensive searching, so here it is.

Karel the Robot
Stanford’s Programming Methodology course starts out with a micro-language called “Karel the Robot”, adapted for Java. The original Karel was a minimalist teaching language based on Pascal, but with extremely reduced syntax. Karel also operated in a highly concrete graphical microworld. As such, it was a great way to show abstract programming concepts without the language getting in the way.

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