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Writing about FOSS sexism

So what have I learned exactly? To start with, while members of the FOSS community like to think of themselves as rational beings, when subjects like gender issues are raised, emotion swamps logic to an alarming degree.

This tendency shows up occasionally among feminists in over-reactions, such as the call by srlinuxx on Tuxmachines.org to boycott Ubuntu because of its founder Mark Shuttleworth made some sexist remarks in his LinuxCon keynote. However, such reactions are understandable, given that the issue is just now being discussed openly after years of people gritting their teeth in silence.

They are also a minority of reactions.

rest here




boycotting ubuntu

He's the third person to (mis)quote me as if I was calling for a wide-spread cross-the-internet boycott of ubuntu. Even if I had such a desire, I wouldn't have the audacity to think anyone would listen to me.

I was merely asking if ignoring ubuntu on my website would cause too much degradation in quality of the set of links and if folks would quit coming if I did.

geez. does anyone actually read passed the headline anymore?

Boycott Ubuntu bloggers

Just boycott Ubunutu bloggers. They've taken to just out right lying about the distro these days. I mean big bold face lies. The kind you usually hear from Microsoft.

What? You mean Ubuntu doesn't

Cure cancer, make your kids smarter, make 3rd world people instant millionaires, predict the future, improve your sex life or whiten your teeth?

Amazing.

Big Bear

re: ubuntu

I don't know about all that, but I lost 10 pounds in a week using Ubuntu!

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today's howtos

Uruk GNU/Linux 1.0

Uruk GNU/Linux appears to be a fairly young project with some lofty goals, but some rough edges and unusual characteristics. I applaud the developers' attempts to provide a pure free software distribution, particularly their use of Gnash to provide a pretty good stand-in for Adobe's Flash player. Gnash is not perfect, but it should work well enough for most people. On the other hand, Uruk does not appear to offer much above and beyond what Trisquel provides. Uruk uses Trisquel's repositories and maintains the same free software only stance, but does not appear to provide a lot that Trisquel on its own does not already offer. Uruk does feature some add-ons from Linux Mint, like the update manager. However, this tends to work against the distribution as the update manager hides most security updates by default while Mint usually shows all updates, minus just the ones known to cause problems with stability. As I mentioned above, the package compatibility tools talked about on the Uruk website do not really deliver and are hampered by the missing alien package in the default installation. The build-from-source u-src tool may be handy in some limited cases, but it only works in very simple scenarios with specific archive types and build processes. Hopefully these package compatibility tools will be expanded for future releases. Right now I'm not sure Uruk provides much above what Trisquel 7.0 provided two years ago. The project is still young and may grow in time. This is a 1.0 release and I would hold off trying the distribution until it has time to build toward its goals. Read more

OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 Beta2 OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 Beta2

Leap 42.2 Beta2 is looking pretty good, except for the problems with Plasma 5 and the nouveau driver. That’s really an upstream issue (a “kde.org” issue). I hope that is fixed in time for the final release. Otherwise, I may have to give up on KDE for that box. Read more