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Linux Quick Fix Notebook

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On the whole we're wary of books that promise instant wisdom. Generally those books that promise to make you a guru in 30 seconds fail to deliver.

So we have to admit that we didn't have high hopes for Linux Quick Fix Notebook; the title is uninspiring and makes it sound like another book promising expertise without effort. But this is far from the truth and, contrary to what we expected, this is a book that can easily be recommended.

Aimed at the experienced user or IT professional, this is a book that provides a series of practical tutorials around common activities that require fixing or trouble shooting. While there's some exploration of underlying principles, the main emphasis is on getting things done. It's certainly not a book that is designed to 'teach Linux', and things like basic installation, configuring desktops, using open source office applications etc are not covered. In other words this isn't a book for someone moving to Linux for the first time. Instead this is the sort of book that would appeal to a power user, would-be administrator or developer who already has some knowledge and experience of Linux.

Furthermore the book is geared around command-line use. This neatly avoids differences between desktops (KDE vs GNOME, for example), and provides a fairly generic set of tools. The book is also fairly agnostic as to which distribution to use.

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