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Batch Process Photos with Phatch

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Software

Virtually any photo manager out there lets you perform mundane tasks like adjusting contrast, adding a watermark, or applying effects to your photos. But even the most powerful applications like digiKam or F-Spot can’t really help you when you need to perform the same action (or a sequence of actions) on dozens or hundreds of photos. For those tasks you need a batch processing utility like Phatch. This nifty tool can perform no less than 35 different actions on your photos, and its user-friendly graphical interface makes it easy to create advanced multi-step batch rules (or action lists in Phatch’s parlance).

If you are using Ubuntu, installing Phatch is as easy as downloading its .deb package and double-clicking on it. If you want to be able to view EXIF and IPTC data, you should also install the python-pyexiv2 package, and for a “cool nautilus integration” Phatch’s Web site recommends installing the python-nautilus package. Unlike conventional image editing applications, Phatch doesn’t allow you to edit photos directly — instead, you use it to set up actions. An action in Phatch is a single operation that the application performs on the photos that are fed into it. Each action offers a number of options: for example, the Scale action allows you to specify the width and height, resolution, and resampling algorithm. You can add as many actions as you like, and the project’s wiki ( http://photobatch.wikidot.com/actions) provides a list of all actions supported by the Phatch.

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