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Linux is just too open

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Linux

The Problem with Linux is that it is forthright, open and honest. Now I know how much the editors here hate when I anthropomorphize an operating system, but it is fundamentally true.

Linux, in my view, remains almost too honest and too open.

The startup shares every detail of protocols and daemons being loaded, commands like du and top tell you the whole truth about how much system resources are being used, and the applications that run on Linux adhere to this same kind of honesty.

And the system processes can not simply change configuration details without adhering to pre-defined permissions.

Moreover, they must place configurations in nice readable files like apache.conf or dhcpd.conf, plain text readable with even simple commands like more (no pun intended). And they must remain totally submissive to the overall security and file system policies already in place.

Windows, on the other hand, is another story.

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