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Ubuntu readies the Karmic Koala

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Ubuntu




Grub2

Lots of posts about Grub2 failures on their forum. Hope they didn't make a mistake about moving to Grub2 when everyone else is still using the tried and true original Grub.

No, they made the mistake...

Grub2 is still in heavy development and isn't ready for production installations. However, just as Kubuntu jumped the gun with KDE 4 when it was still raw, Ubuntu is pushing unfinished work down their user's throat. That's okay if you're Fedora, but Ubuntu users expect a working machine.

We'll see what happens on release day

My experience is mixed - GRUB2 doesn't seem to have any problems whatsoever booting into other Linux distros, but on one box, with the Ubuntu beta, it wouldn't boot into WinXP. At least the error message was interesting:

Windows could not start because the following file is missing or corrupt: <Windows root>\system32\ntoskrnl.exe Please re-install a copy of the above file.

Naturally, it boots just fine using legacy GRUB.

On another box, GRUB2 boots into WinXP just fine. I don't know if it's because the first box has a combination of SATA and PATA drives and the second box just has PATA drives, or if it's because the GRUB2 package has been updated several times since the Ubuntu beta came out on the second box.

But they are taking a risk. A bad experience with a bootloader will definitely turn people away.

Heavy yes, development... less so

Don't you notice anything strange in the "heavy development" history of GRUB2?

1.90 2005-08-07
1.91 2005-10-15
1.92 2005-12-25
1.93 2006-03-17
1.94 2006-06-04
1.95 2006-10-15

Nothing happens for one year and half, then...

1.96 2008-02-03

...then nothing happens for another year and half and, after some betas, 1.97 is released 20 months after 1.96:

1.97 2009-10-25

Now, if they can't release it in more than 4 years, is it anything from GNU that can be trusted? (GNU/Hurd, maybe?)

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