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Organizing Files

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Linux

The problem: the filesystem on my Unix workstation was a mess. I couldn't find anything without grepping all over creation. About half the time, I'd actually find something useful. Usually I'd get no hits at all, or I'd match something like a compiled binary and end up hosing my display beyond belief.

I wrote this from a Unix/Linux perspective, but Mac users running a recent version of the operating system should be able to make sense of it. Here are some terms for non-Unix types:

*A Unix home directory is the equivalent of wherever you keep most of your working files. The tilde (~) is just shorthand for that directory, as is $HOME.
*The cat command displays a file to your screen.
*Folder names use / instead of \ as separators.

What Didn't Work

This is what didn't do the trick.

Full Story.

some solutions

If you have this much trouble managing files, try using Mac OS 10.4 or wait for KDE 4. You could also try to set up a database with keywords or hyperlink them together with web pages. I work with all my own stuff and have found a system that works, but this requires organizational ability and has no easy answers except the before mentioned software.

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