Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Giving power to the user in front of the screen

Filed under
HowTos

Modern desktop computers running Linux have a sort of double personality that they do not usually share with Windows-based PCs. On the one hand, they are used as single-user workstations where the operator is granted full access to the machine resources, and on the other hand they are also real servers.

Of course there is no reason why a network user located far away should have free access to our machine's audio device or, much worse, to the modem configuration.

With Linux rising popularity in the desktop market, we need a way to distinguish the "user in front of the screen" (better named desktop user) from the "user from far away" (better named remote user), and grant them different rights. This is how I solved this problem for my local network of double souled computers.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Linux and Graphics

today's howtos

Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Delayed Until February 2, Will Bring Linux 4.8, Newer Mesa

If you've been waiting to upgrade your Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system to the 16.04.2 point release, which should have hit the streets a couple of days ago, you'll have to wait until February 2. We hate to give you guys bad news, but Canonical's engineers are still working hard these days to port all the goodies from the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) repositories to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which is a long-term supported version, until 2019. These include the Linux 4.8 kernel packages and an updated graphics stack based on a newer X.Org Server version and Mesa 3D Graphics Library. Read more