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Dual-Booting Linux And Windows: Easier Said than Done

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OS

”Dual-booting with Windows and desktop Linux is a snap to do.”

This statement is at best a half-truth as it really depends on the skill set of the person trying to install Linux along side Windows. Despite this, I hear people stating this as a fact nearly everyday. Drives me bananas.

When it comes to running multiple operating systems on a computer, I think that most distro providers do little to deter their users from making what can be serious partitioning mistakes.

Figuring that it must be the end user's sole responsibility to "get it right," people are often seen in the various users forums complaining how Linux deleted their Windows install. Clearly there has to be a more consistent way of addressing this.

One near foolproof approach is to run with a dedicated Linux PC. Not a practical solution for everyone, but a solid option nonetheless.

The second approach might be to make a disk image of your Windows installation.

REst Here




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