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Do The Banshee Shuffle

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Software

My family has a couple of those tiny little audio players called the iPod Shuffle. It is a bare-bones 1/4" x 3/4" x 1" solid-state wonder that can store and play about 250 songs. They are great for use when working out or doing chores.

Vista finally went belly up on my wife's duo-core AMD-powered HP laptop. Naturally, being a Linux guy, I never bothered with building a recovery partition (or what ever it's called) in case of disaster and failed to notice that no Vista CD was included in the welcome package. I also thought that we might have a disk going south. How would a recovery partition help me, in that case anyway?

In a fit of rage I backed up everything of value, booting from an Xubuntu USB stick, then repartitioned the disk. Out with Vista, in with Xubuntu. The disk turned out to be just fine and the machine is now significantly faster and much more reliable.

Of course we needed an iTunes replacement and Banshee turned out to have all the features we needed to maintain the Shuffles.
Here's a rundown on the application.

Shuffling With Banshee




Banshee rocks.

I've switched to Banshee for my music playing needs. Amarok on KDE 4.3.2 seems a bit too crash happy with my existing music collection.

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