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Pirated software

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Humor

If you think I'm going to talk about the moral, legal, financial, and political implications of using software not according to various license agreements set by money-loving companies, you're wrong. This article is not about the subtle use of the word piracy, which is all about plunder, robbery and violence, with the somewhat foggy misuse of software in the free world of Internet. This article is not about big corporations and their draconian use of capital to squash competition and choke technological advancements. This article has nothing to do with digital piracy.

This article is all about software, designed, run and used by pirates! Dr. Pun, all the way!

Today, we will learn about little known software known as pirated software; software designed by code pirates, people with itchy beards and growly talk, people with pet parrots, wooden keyboards and a liking for sea faring simulation games.

Lean back and enjoy a lesson in maritime programming!

What does pirate software look like?




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