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Ubuntu users

Completely switched
31% (220 votes)
Run ubuntu & others
33% (230 votes)
Use ubuntu derivative
13% (92 votes)
Formerly used
23% (158 votes)
Total votes: 700

It would be interesting

It would be interesting to see the percentage of Ubuntu users, who stick with it, among those who actually use Linux as their OS, and not just for fun; in short leaving out the dual booters.

Hmm...

I got into Linux via DSL. My laptop was pitching fits because of an internal issue ( it was overheating really badly ) and the near nonexistant needs of DSL made that machine run like a dream. I then found Ubuntu in early '05 ( Warty ) and used it on and off. I moved onto Xubuntu and after that machine died, adopted Debian and have been happy there ever since.

re: Unoobtu

Once, when I discovered an asteroid on a collision course with Earth, I loaded up Unoobtu in a VM on my trusty XP lappy and sure enough, just like the drooling Unoobtu fanboys blog about - it saved the planet.

Of course it took me a few tries, finally I remembered it was "sudo save planet" and then it worked.

True story - really.

Ubuntu off and on

Ubuntu was not the first distro I tried, but after all the hooplah about it I figured I'd give it a try on the desktop. It never lasted very long. I usually went back to Vector Linux, although now I use PCLinuxOS. One PC has a KDE3 desktop and the other has an e17 desktop.

I've made frequent use of an Ubuntu liveCD to fix Windows problems, although I prefer rolling my own Slax. I do have a healthy respect for OpenGEU, which used to be called GeoBuntu, or similar. It's, so far, based on the 8.04 LTS, so it's more conservative. I like it because it is stable and it uses an e17 desktop by default (no installation required). I've kept a running and updated copy in VirtualBox for about a year now. Their e17 version is older than the one available with PCLOS or Mandriva, but like I said, it's stable.

I have time ...

Lets see, up until 2006 I had been with Windows from the early 90's. So, the way I figure it, I have years to go before I need to think about switching from Ubuntu. Being lazy might have something to do with it too.

I've been with Ubuntu since

I've been with Ubuntu since 8.04 LTS, all was fine until 9.10 Sad Guess I was one of the unlucky types that has problems with 9.10....

Got real tired of the Ubuntu release cycle and seriously gave thought on trying Windows 7, gave the new PCLinuxOS Zen (Gnome) a try instead. All is well in PCLOS land and it's keeping thoughts of Windows 7 at bay.

Former Ubuntu user

I used Ubuntu for a while, but have now switched to Arch Linux. I love Arch, I feel like I'm home Smile

Never.

Never used it. Never will.

What if?

What if, you didn't start with it, but along the way, you used it as your main distro for a time, only to be dissatisfied and went somewhere else?

re: what if?

added formerly used for that. Thanks!

un-official study of Linux introduction via ubuntu

I would like to see how many people who have started their linux journey with ubuntu, still use ubuntu, or have absconded to another distro since or simply expanded heir experience by running more than that one distro.

I am curious because the recent discussion of how blatant fanboyism can cloud facts piqued my curiosity to see how loyal to ubuntu people are or if they see Linux as the overall entity and can see more than one color of the rainbow, per se.

Big Bear

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