Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Digging Distributed Journalism: Digg.com

Filed under
Web

For those of you who haven't heard about Digg, it's a news site that relies on its readers to determine what the most important news stories are that day. Here's how it works. Every day, thousands of news hackers log onto Digg.com, where they post links to main stream news stories and blogs that they find interesting. They type out a short summary of why they like the story. That link and the description show up in a pool of news links on the Digg for Stories page, where other Diggers, and the entire Internet, can see those stories. Diggers who like those stories vote for the particular stories they want to promote by clicking a "Digg" button. After a story gets x number of votes (Diggs), it is promoted to the Digg home page, which is where the day's "headlines" appear. You have to be a registered Digger to vote for a story, but registration is easy and free.

In essence, Digg has turned its readers into news editors. Doc Searls has famously said that "open source is what happens when the demand side supplies itself." Digg has been applying that concept to the news since its birth day on December 5, 2004. As the two lead Diggers, Digg CEO Jay Adelson and Digg founder Kevin Rose, explain in this interview, by February, 2005, the mainstream media were already calling Kevin and Jay on the phone, wondering why they were getting spikes in traffic from Digg.com.

Obviously, big media called because they were sweating. Fueled by the open source community and indie media organizations and individual bloggers, Digg is "Disrupting the Fourth Estate" by doing the news cheaper, faster, and more narrowly tailored to the tastes of its individual readers. Kevin Rose started Digg with only about $1,000.00 USD in cash expenditures. Big media no longer is the sole owner of the printing presses. If Kevin can start Digg with only $1,000.00 and enable his millions of daily readers to become news editors, what does that mean for the future of big media?

It means the revolution WILL be televised. As Kevin and Jay explain in this interview, Digg is just getting started. It will branch out from its current emphasis on tech news, and will soon be weighing in the broader topics that are the bread and butter of big media, and they will be doing it with video, by aggregating links to video clips like they now do with links to mostly still image text websites. In this interview, Kevin and Jay talk in depth about Digg, it's history, why Digg works, and Digg's international aspirations, and where Digg is going in the future.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

What’s new in Fedora 22 Workstation

The Fedora Workstation edition is a reliable, user-friendly, and powerful operating system for your laptop or desktop computer. It supports a wide range of developers, from hobbyists and students to professionals in corporate environments. Fedora 22 Workstation builds on the previous initial release of Fedora 21 Workstation, providing a set of enhancements designed to boost your workflow and help your productivity. Read more

Watch: Mark Shuttleworth's Keynote at the OpenStack Summit 2015

As expected, Canonical was present at the OpenStack Summit 2015 event that took place in Vancouver, British Columbia between May 18-22. Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Going Free/Open Source

  • Twitter Kit and Digits for Android go open source
    With a swarm of developers from around the world converging on San Francisco’s Moscone Center tomorrow for Google I/O, Twitter wants them to keep the company’s real-time social platform at the top of mind. This afternoon it announced that its developer tools for integrating Twitter into Android apps have been open-sourced, with the projects now hosted publicly on Github.
  • First Look Publishes Open Source Code To Advance Privacy, Security, and Journalism
    The Intercept and its publisher First Look Media strongly believe in the benefits of free and open source software — in part because we rely on such software every day. To keep our journalists and sources safe, we use secure communication tools like the data-encryption system GnuPG, the Off-the-Record secure messaging protocol, the SecureDrop communications platform, and the secure calling and texting app Signal. To publish on the web, we use the GNU/Linux operating system; the Apache web server; OpenSSL, a web encryption library; WordPress, the open-source blogging engine; and Piwik, which tracks web traffic. The list goes on.
  • Google Makes The Roboto Typeface Open Source
    With Ice Cream Sandwich, Google introduced Roboto to the world. Since then, the family (designed by Googler Christian Robertson) has expanded to include a set of slab serif fonts, and has even seen a major revision introduced with Android 5.0 last year.